Smoking-cessation counseling in the home: Attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of home healthcare nurses

Belinda Borrelli, Jacklyn P. Hecht, George D. Papandonatos, Karen M. Emmons, Lisa R. Tatewosian, David Brian Abrams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Despite advances in smoking treatment, cessation rates remain stagnant, possibly a function of the lack of new channels to reach heavily addicted smokers. This cross-sectional study examined home care nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and counseling behaviors regarding counseling their home care patients who smoke. Methods: Home healthcare nurses (N=98) from the Visiting Nurse Association of Rhode Island were randomly selected to participate in a study helping home-bound medically ill smokers to quit. At baseline, nurses completed a questionnaire that assessed a constellation of cognitive factors (self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceived effectiveness, risk perception, motivation, and perceived patient adherence) as correlates of self-reported nurse counseling behaviors. Results: Nurses with higher outcome expectations spent more time counseling their patients about quitting (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-277
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Community Health Nurses
Smoking Cessation
Counseling
Delivery of Health Care
Nurses
Home Care Services
Self Efficacy
Patient Compliance
Smoke
Motivation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Borrelli, B., Hecht, J. P., Papandonatos, G. D., Emmons, K. M., Tatewosian, L. R., & Abrams, D. B. (2001). Smoking-cessation counseling in the home: Attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of home healthcare nurses. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 21(4), 272-277. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0749-3797(01)00369-5

Smoking-cessation counseling in the home : Attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of home healthcare nurses. / Borrelli, Belinda; Hecht, Jacklyn P.; Papandonatos, George D.; Emmons, Karen M.; Tatewosian, Lisa R.; Abrams, David Brian.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2001, p. 272-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borrelli, Belinda ; Hecht, Jacklyn P. ; Papandonatos, George D. ; Emmons, Karen M. ; Tatewosian, Lisa R. ; Abrams, David Brian. / Smoking-cessation counseling in the home : Attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of home healthcare nurses. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 272-277.
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