Smoking cessation and recidivism in the women's interagency human immunodeficiency virus study

Nancy A. Hessol, Kathleen M. Weber, Gypsyamber D'Souza, Dee Burton, Mary Young, Joel Milam, Lynn Murchison, Monica Gandhi, Mardge H. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Smoking increases the risk of morbidity and mortality and is particularly harmful to HIV-infected people. Purpose To explore smoking trends and longitudinal factors associated with smoking cessation and recidivism among participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Methods From 1994 through 2011, a total of 2,961 HIV-infected and 981 HIV-uninfected women were enrolled and underwent semi-annual interviews and specimen collection. Smoking prevalence was evaluated annually and risk factors associated with time to smoking cessation and recidivism were analyzed in 2013 using survival models. Results The annual cigarette smoking prevalence declined from 57% in 1995 to 39% in 2011 (p-trend<0.0001). Among smokers, factors significantly associated with a longer time to smoking cessation included less education, alcohol use, having health insurance, >10-year smoking duration, self-reported poor health rating, and having hypertension. Pregnancy in the past 6 months was associated with a shorter time to cessation. Among HIV-infected women, additional risk factors for longer time to cessation included lower household income, use of crack/cocaine/heroin, CD4 cell count ≤200, and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use. Predictors of smoking recidivism included marijuana use, enrollment in 1994-1996, and not living in one's own place. Among HIV-infected women, enrollment in 2001-2002 and crack/cocaine/heroin use were associated with a shorter time to recidivism, whereas older age and HAART use were associated with a longer time to recidivism. Conclusions Despite declining rates of cigarette smoking, integrated interventions are needed to help women with and at risk for HIV infection to quit smoking and sustain cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-69
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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