Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001

C. P. Wen, D. T. Levy, T. Yuan Cheng, C. C. Hsu, S. P. Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To examine smoking behaviours in Taiwan and compare those behaviours to those in the USA. Methods: Using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of Taiwan (2001), a survey of over 20 000 participants, frequencies were calculated for smoking, ex-smoking, quantity smoked, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Breakdowns by age, sex, and socioeconomic status were also calculated. Results: The ratio of male to female smoking rates was 10.9 to 1 among adults (46.8%/4.3%), but 3.6 to 1 among underage teenagers (14.3%/4.0%). The proportion of underage to adult smokers was three times higher for girls than for boys. Smoking prevalence substantially increased during and after high school years, and peaked in those aged 30-39 years. Smoking rates of high school age adolescents increased more than threefold if they did not attend school or if they finished their education after high school. Low income and less educated smokers smoked at nearly twice the rate of high income and better educated smokers. The smoker/ex-smoker ratio was close to 7. Male daily smokers smoked on average 17 cigarettes/day, and females, 11. Half of the total population, especially infants and women of childbearing age, were exposed to ETS at home. Conclusions: Taiwan has particularly high male smoking prevalence and much lower female prevalence. The low female prevalence is likely to increase if the current sex ratio of smoking by underage youth continues. The low quit rate among males, the high ETS exposure of females and young children at home, and the sharp increase in smoking rates when students leave school, are of particular concern. These observations on smoking behaviour can provide valuable insights to assist policymakers and health educators in formulating strategies and allocating resources in tobacco control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTobacco Control
Volume14
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Taiwan
smoking
Smoking
nicotine
Tobacco
underage
Smoke
school
Health Educators
sex ratio
Sex Ratio
Environmental Exposure
Health Surveys
health
Social Class
Tobacco Products
social status
infant
low income
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Wen, C. P., Levy, D. T., Yuan Cheng, T., Hsu, C. C., & Tsai, S. P. (2005). Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001. Tobacco Control, 14(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.2004.008011

Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001. / Wen, C. P.; Levy, D. T.; Yuan Cheng, T.; Hsu, C. C.; Tsai, S. P.

In: Tobacco Control, Vol. 14, No. SUPPL. 1, 06.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wen, CP, Levy, DT, Yuan Cheng, T, Hsu, CC & Tsai, SP 2005, 'Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001', Tobacco Control, vol. 14, no. SUPPL. 1. https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.2004.008011
Wen CP, Levy DT, Yuan Cheng T, Hsu CC, Tsai SP. Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001. Tobacco Control. 2005 Jun;14(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.2004.008011
Wen, C. P. ; Levy, D. T. ; Yuan Cheng, T. ; Hsu, C. C. ; Tsai, S. P. / Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001. In: Tobacco Control. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. SUPPL. 1.
@article{b4b403623f0141c1a89ffccb1142e690,
title = "Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001",
abstract = "Purpose: To examine smoking behaviours in Taiwan and compare those behaviours to those in the USA. Methods: Using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of Taiwan (2001), a survey of over 20 000 participants, frequencies were calculated for smoking, ex-smoking, quantity smoked, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Breakdowns by age, sex, and socioeconomic status were also calculated. Results: The ratio of male to female smoking rates was 10.9 to 1 among adults (46.8{\%}/4.3{\%}), but 3.6 to 1 among underage teenagers (14.3{\%}/4.0{\%}). The proportion of underage to adult smokers was three times higher for girls than for boys. Smoking prevalence substantially increased during and after high school years, and peaked in those aged 30-39 years. Smoking rates of high school age adolescents increased more than threefold if they did not attend school or if they finished their education after high school. Low income and less educated smokers smoked at nearly twice the rate of high income and better educated smokers. The smoker/ex-smoker ratio was close to 7. Male daily smokers smoked on average 17 cigarettes/day, and females, 11. Half of the total population, especially infants and women of childbearing age, were exposed to ETS at home. Conclusions: Taiwan has particularly high male smoking prevalence and much lower female prevalence. The low female prevalence is likely to increase if the current sex ratio of smoking by underage youth continues. The low quit rate among males, the high ETS exposure of females and young children at home, and the sharp increase in smoking rates when students leave school, are of particular concern. These observations on smoking behaviour can provide valuable insights to assist policymakers and health educators in formulating strategies and allocating resources in tobacco control.",
author = "Wen, {C. P.} and Levy, {D. T.} and {Yuan Cheng}, T. and Hsu, {C. C.} and Tsai, {S. P.}",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1136/tc.2004.008011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
journal = "Tobacco Control",
issn = "0964-4563",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smoking behaviour in Taiwan, 2001

AU - Wen, C. P.

AU - Levy, D. T.

AU - Yuan Cheng, T.

AU - Hsu, C. C.

AU - Tsai, S. P.

PY - 2005/6

Y1 - 2005/6

N2 - Purpose: To examine smoking behaviours in Taiwan and compare those behaviours to those in the USA. Methods: Using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of Taiwan (2001), a survey of over 20 000 participants, frequencies were calculated for smoking, ex-smoking, quantity smoked, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Breakdowns by age, sex, and socioeconomic status were also calculated. Results: The ratio of male to female smoking rates was 10.9 to 1 among adults (46.8%/4.3%), but 3.6 to 1 among underage teenagers (14.3%/4.0%). The proportion of underage to adult smokers was three times higher for girls than for boys. Smoking prevalence substantially increased during and after high school years, and peaked in those aged 30-39 years. Smoking rates of high school age adolescents increased more than threefold if they did not attend school or if they finished their education after high school. Low income and less educated smokers smoked at nearly twice the rate of high income and better educated smokers. The smoker/ex-smoker ratio was close to 7. Male daily smokers smoked on average 17 cigarettes/day, and females, 11. Half of the total population, especially infants and women of childbearing age, were exposed to ETS at home. Conclusions: Taiwan has particularly high male smoking prevalence and much lower female prevalence. The low female prevalence is likely to increase if the current sex ratio of smoking by underage youth continues. The low quit rate among males, the high ETS exposure of females and young children at home, and the sharp increase in smoking rates when students leave school, are of particular concern. These observations on smoking behaviour can provide valuable insights to assist policymakers and health educators in formulating strategies and allocating resources in tobacco control.

AB - Purpose: To examine smoking behaviours in Taiwan and compare those behaviours to those in the USA. Methods: Using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) of Taiwan (2001), a survey of over 20 000 participants, frequencies were calculated for smoking, ex-smoking, quantity smoked, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Breakdowns by age, sex, and socioeconomic status were also calculated. Results: The ratio of male to female smoking rates was 10.9 to 1 among adults (46.8%/4.3%), but 3.6 to 1 among underage teenagers (14.3%/4.0%). The proportion of underage to adult smokers was three times higher for girls than for boys. Smoking prevalence substantially increased during and after high school years, and peaked in those aged 30-39 years. Smoking rates of high school age adolescents increased more than threefold if they did not attend school or if they finished their education after high school. Low income and less educated smokers smoked at nearly twice the rate of high income and better educated smokers. The smoker/ex-smoker ratio was close to 7. Male daily smokers smoked on average 17 cigarettes/day, and females, 11. Half of the total population, especially infants and women of childbearing age, were exposed to ETS at home. Conclusions: Taiwan has particularly high male smoking prevalence and much lower female prevalence. The low female prevalence is likely to increase if the current sex ratio of smoking by underage youth continues. The low quit rate among males, the high ETS exposure of females and young children at home, and the sharp increase in smoking rates when students leave school, are of particular concern. These observations on smoking behaviour can provide valuable insights to assist policymakers and health educators in formulating strategies and allocating resources in tobacco control.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20444400565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20444400565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/tc.2004.008011

DO - 10.1136/tc.2004.008011

M3 - Article

C2 - 15923450

AN - SCOPUS:20444400565

VL - 14

JO - Tobacco Control

JF - Tobacco Control

SN - 0964-4563

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -