Smoking and illicit drug use during pregnancy: Impact on neonatal outcome

Donna R. Miles, Susan Lanni, Lauren M Jansson, Dace Svikis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of maternal substance use on neonatal outcomes in 212 pregnant cocaine/opiate dependent women who delivered while in active drug treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Using urine toxicology data at delivery, subjects were classified drug positive (+TOX) (n = 53) or negative (-TOX) (n = 159). Maternal smoking was related to NICU LOS, even among polydrug-dependent patients... RESULTS: Toxicology status was not associated with maternal or neonatal demographic or drug use variables. +TOX patients were enrolled in the treatment program for a shorter period of time than -TOX (683 vs. 91.3 days, p = 0.005). Infant birth weight ratio (IBR) ivas lower in +TOX women (0.84 vs. 0.90, p = 0.003). +TOX women were hvice as likely to have small-for-gestational- age (IBR <0.85) neonates than were -TOX. Length of stay (LOS) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was not associated with maternal toxicology but was associated with quantity of tobacco per day (p = 0.0001). NICU neonates with heavily smoking mothers (11+ cigarettes/day) averaged LOS = 9.5 days as compared to light (1-10 cigarettes per day) smokers (LOS = 7.9 days) and nonsmokers (LOS = 5.5 days). CONCLUSION: Maternal drug abstinence is associated ivith higher 1ER. Maternal smoking is related to NICU LOS, even among poly drug-dependent women. These data are clinically and economically important and support the need for smoking cessation interventions in high-risk populations, such as drug-dependent pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-572
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Volume51
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Street Drugs
Smoking
Mothers
Length of Stay
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Pregnancy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Toxicology
Birth Weight
Tobacco Products
Opiate Alkaloids
Newborn Infant
Small for Gestational Age Infant
Smoking Cessation
Cocaine
Tobacco
Pregnant Women
Demography
Urine
Light

Keywords

  • Illicit drugs
  • Pregnancy complications
  • Pregnancy outcome
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Smoking and illicit drug use during pregnancy : Impact on neonatal outcome. / Miles, Donna R.; Lanni, Susan; Jansson, Lauren M; Svikis, Dace.

In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Vol. 51, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 567-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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