Smoking after nicotine deprivation enhances cognitive performance and decreases tobacco craving in drug abusers

Sandra L. Bell, Richard C. Taylor, Edward G. Singleton, Jack E. Henningfield, Stephen J. Heishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of nicotine deprivation and smoking on cognitive abilities and tobacco craving. Twenty smokers with histories of drug abuse completed the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (QSU) and two cognitive tests before and after smoking two cigarettes during two 90-min sessions. After two cigarettes were smoked at Session 1, subjects were tobacco abstinent for 18 h until Session 2 the next morning. Response time on a logical reasoning test was unchanged by tobacco deprivation and was faster after smoking on Session 2. Deprivation slowed responding on a letter search test, which was reversed by smoking to pre-deprivation baseline. Tobacco deprivation increased scores on the QSU; smoking after deprivation reduced craving scores to smoking baseline levels. These results confirmed the utility of the QSU to measure changes in craving induced by tobacco deprivation and smoking. Further, the data suggest that deprivation-induced deficits and smoking-induced enhancements in performance may be specific to certain cognitive domains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-52
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Volume1
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1999

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Drug Users
Nicotine
Tobacco
Smoking
Craving
Aptitude
Tobacco Products
Reaction Time
Substance-Related Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Smoking after nicotine deprivation enhances cognitive performance and decreases tobacco craving in drug abusers. / Bell, Sandra L.; Taylor, Richard C.; Singleton, Edward G.; Henningfield, Jack E.; Heishman, Stephen J.

In: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, Vol. 1, No. 1, 03.1999, p. 45-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, Sandra L. ; Taylor, Richard C. ; Singleton, Edward G. ; Henningfield, Jack E. ; Heishman, Stephen J. / Smoking after nicotine deprivation enhances cognitive performance and decreases tobacco craving in drug abusers. In: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. 1999 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 45-52.
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