Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Predicts Academic Fluency, Beyond Contributions of Core Academic Skills, Attention, and Motor Speed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) is a distinct behavioral phenotype characterized by such symptoms as being slow to complete tasks, appearing drowsy or sleepy, and lacking initiative. Subcomponents of SCT appear differentially associated with inattention symptoms and child outcomes. Much of the work in this area has examined associations between SCT symptoms and ratings of behavior; few studies have examined associations with child performance. Method: We examined associations between SCT and timed reading and math skills in 247 referred youth (M age = 11.55, range = 6-20; 67.6% male), controlling for the untimed academic skills, inattention, and graphomotor speed. Results: SCT consistently predicted timed academic fluency, after controlling for other component skills, for both reading (SCT ΔR2 =.039, p =.001) and math (ΔR2 =.049, p =.001). Conclusion: Results provide initial evidence for the unique association of SCT with timed academic performance. Understanding associations of SCT with actual child performance may allow for greater specificity in targeting interventions to address speed of performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 1 2018

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Motor Skills
Reading
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Phenotype

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • children
  • math
  • neurocognitive measures
  • reading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Predicts Academic Fluency, Beyond Contributions of Core Academic Skills, Attention, and Motor Speed",
abstract = "Objective: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) is a distinct behavioral phenotype characterized by such symptoms as being slow to complete tasks, appearing drowsy or sleepy, and lacking initiative. Subcomponents of SCT appear differentially associated with inattention symptoms and child outcomes. Much of the work in this area has examined associations between SCT symptoms and ratings of behavior; few studies have examined associations with child performance. Method: We examined associations between SCT and timed reading and math skills in 247 referred youth (M age = 11.55, range = 6-20; 67.6{\%} male), controlling for the untimed academic skills, inattention, and graphomotor speed. Results: SCT consistently predicted timed academic fluency, after controlling for other component skills, for both reading (SCT ΔR2 =.039, p =.001) and math (ΔR2 =.049, p =.001). Conclusion: Results provide initial evidence for the unique association of SCT with timed academic performance. Understanding associations of SCT with actual child performance may allow for greater specificity in targeting interventions to address speed of performance.",
keywords = "ADHD, children, math, neurocognitive measures, reading",
author = "Jacobson, {Lisa Anne} and Mahone, {Ernest M}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
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doi = "10.1177/1087054718776468",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Attention Disorders",
issn = "1087-0547",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

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AU - Mahone, Ernest M

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N2 - Objective: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) is a distinct behavioral phenotype characterized by such symptoms as being slow to complete tasks, appearing drowsy or sleepy, and lacking initiative. Subcomponents of SCT appear differentially associated with inattention symptoms and child outcomes. Much of the work in this area has examined associations between SCT symptoms and ratings of behavior; few studies have examined associations with child performance. Method: We examined associations between SCT and timed reading and math skills in 247 referred youth (M age = 11.55, range = 6-20; 67.6% male), controlling for the untimed academic skills, inattention, and graphomotor speed. Results: SCT consistently predicted timed academic fluency, after controlling for other component skills, for both reading (SCT ΔR2 =.039, p =.001) and math (ΔR2 =.049, p =.001). Conclusion: Results provide initial evidence for the unique association of SCT with timed academic performance. Understanding associations of SCT with actual child performance may allow for greater specificity in targeting interventions to address speed of performance.

AB - Objective: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) is a distinct behavioral phenotype characterized by such symptoms as being slow to complete tasks, appearing drowsy or sleepy, and lacking initiative. Subcomponents of SCT appear differentially associated with inattention symptoms and child outcomes. Much of the work in this area has examined associations between SCT symptoms and ratings of behavior; few studies have examined associations with child performance. Method: We examined associations between SCT and timed reading and math skills in 247 referred youth (M age = 11.55, range = 6-20; 67.6% male), controlling for the untimed academic skills, inattention, and graphomotor speed. Results: SCT consistently predicted timed academic fluency, after controlling for other component skills, for both reading (SCT ΔR2 =.039, p =.001) and math (ΔR2 =.049, p =.001). Conclusion: Results provide initial evidence for the unique association of SCT with timed academic performance. Understanding associations of SCT with actual child performance may allow for greater specificity in targeting interventions to address speed of performance.

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KW - children

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KW - reading

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