Slow and fast rod ERG pathways in patients with X-linked complete stationary night blindness carrying mutations in the NYX gene

H. P.N. Scholl, H. Langrová, C. M. Pusch, B. Wissinger, E. Zrenner, E. Apfelstedt-Sylla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE. To study the slow and fast rod signals of the scotopic 15-Hz flicker ERG in patients carrying mutations in the NYX gene, which has been recently identified as the cause of the complete form of congenital stationary night blindness, CSNB1. METHODS. Twenty eyes of 11 patients with CSNB1 who had nondetectable standard ERG rod b-waves were involved in the study. Scotopic ERG response amplitudes and phases to flicker intensities ranging from -3.37 to -0.57 log scotopic trolands · sec (scot td · sec) were measured at a flicker frequency of 15 Hz. ERG signals to flicker intensities between -3.37 and -1.97 and between -1.17 and -0.57 log scot td · sec were considered to represent primarily the slow and fast rod ERG pathway, respectively. Additionally, standard ERGs were performed. Twenty-two normal volunteers served as control subjects. RESULTS. For the slow rod ERG pathway, all patients exhibited ERG signals that were indistinguishable from noise. Accordingly, there was no systematic phase behavior for the slow rod signals. For the fast rod ERG pathway, the signals were significantly above noise, but they were significantly reduced in amplitude and advanced in phase. CONCLUSIONS. There is evidence that the slow and the fast rod ERG signals can be attributed to the rod bipolar-AII cell pathway and the rod-cone-coupling pathway, respectively. The current study provides evidence to suggest that a defective NYX gene product (nyctalopin) prevents detectable signal transmission through ON rod bipolar cells, but there is a residual transmission through rod-cone gap junctions in CSNB1, possibly through the OFF cone pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2728-2736
Number of pages9
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume42
Issue number11
StatePublished - Oct 22 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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