Slow Acceptance of Universal Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among Mothers Enrolled in IMPAACT PROMISE Studies Across the Globe

for the PROMISE study team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The PROMISE trial enrolled asymptomatic HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women not eligible for antiretroviral treatment (ART) per local guidelines and randomly assigned proven antiretroviral strategies to assess relative efficacy for perinatal prevention plus maternal/infant safety and maternal health. The START study subsequently demonstrated clear benefit in initiating ART regardless of CD4 count. Active PROMISE participants were informed of results and women not receiving ART were strongly recommended to immediately initiate treatment to optimize their own health. We recorded their decision and the primary reason given for accepting or rejecting the universal ART offer after receiving the START information. One-third of participants did not initiate ART after the initial session, wanting more time to consider. Six sessions were required to attain 95% uptake. The slow uptake of universal ART highlights the need to prepare individuals and sensitize communities regarding the personal and population benefits of the “Treat All” strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2522-2531
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Keywords

  • Treat All
  • Universal ART
  • Women with HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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