Sleep duration and snoring associate with hypertension and glycaemic control in patients with diabetes

T. Wang, J. Lu, W. Wang, Y. Mu, J. Zhao, C. Liu, L. Chen, L. Shi, Q. Li, T. Yang, L. Yan, Q. Wan, S. Wu, Y. Liu, G. Wang, Z. Luo, X. Tang, G. Chen, Y. Huo, Z. GaoQ. Su, Z. Ye, Y. Wang, G. Qin, H. Deng, X. Yu, F. Shen, L. Chen, L. Zhao, M. Xu, J. Sun, Y. Bi, S. Lai, Z. T. Bloomgarden, D. Li, G. Ning, REACTION Study Group the REACTION Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: Few studies have analysed the effect of sleep duration and snoring on hypertension and glycaemic control in patients with diabetes. This study aims to investigate the relationship of sleep duration and snoring on prevalent hypertension and glycaemic control in people with diabetes. Methods: In the baseline survey of the REACTION study, 56 032 patients with diabetes were categorized into four groups according to self-reported sleep duration: < 6, 6-7.9, 8-8.9 and ≥ 9 h. Snoring frequency was evaluated as 'usually', 'occasionally' or 'never'. Hypertension was assessed by systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, self-reported previous diagnosis and antihypertensive medications. 'Good' glycaemic control was defined as HbA1c < 53 mmol/mol (7.0%) and 'poor' glycaemic control as HbA1c ≥ 53 mmol/mol (7.0%). Results: Controlling for potential confounders and intermediates, sleep ≥ 9 h relative to intermediate sleep (6-7.9 h) was significantly associated with prevalent hypertension (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.18-1.32) and poor glycaemic control (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.05-1.18), and a U-shaped association was found between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension (P for quadratic trend = 0.019). Usually snoring was positively associated with prevalent hypertension (OR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.23-1.37), whereas the association between snoring and poor glycaemic control was only on the borderline of statistical significance. Conclusions: Compared with a sleep duration of 6-7.9 h, longer sleep duration was associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension and poor glycaemic control in people with diabetes. Moreover, the relationship between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension was U-shaped. These findings may propose important public health implications for diabetes management. What's new?: Longer sleep duration (≥ 8 h) was positively associated with prevalent hypertension and poor glycaemic control in patients with diabetes, and the association between sleep duration and prevalent hypertension was U-shaped. The findings may have implications for diabetes management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1007
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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