Sleep Disturbance and Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis: a Systematic Review

Abbey Hughes, Katherine M. Dunn, Trisha Chaffee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Purpose of Review: The present review summarizes recent research on the association between sleep disturbance and cognitive dysfunction in MS. Assessment methodology, domain-specific associations between sleep disturbance and cognitive dysfunction, and implications for future research and treatment are discussed. Recent Findings: All 12 studies included in this review found significant associations between sleep disturbance and cognitive dysfunction; however, results varied considerably depending on the assessment method used and the cognitive domain assessed. Self-reported sleep disturbance generally predicted self-report but not objective measures of cognitive dysfunction. Objective sleep measures (e.g., polysomnography, actigraphy) generally predicted objective impairments in processing speed and attention; however, objective sleep disturbance was more variable in predicting performance in other cognitive domains (e.g., memory, executive function). Summary: Sleep disturbance may help predict future cognitive decline in MS. Results highlight the need to integrate sleep assessment into routine MS care. Interventions aimed treating sleep disturbance may offer promise for improving cognitive dysfunction in MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2
JournalCurrent Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Multiple Sclerosis
Sleep
Actigraphy
Cognitive Dysfunction
Polysomnography
Executive Function
Self Report
Research

Keywords

  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Sleep
  • Sleep disorders
  • Sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Sleep Disturbance and Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis : a Systematic Review. / Hughes, Abbey; Dunn, Katherine M.; Chaffee, Trisha.

In: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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