SLC26A4 genotype, but not cochlear radiologic structure, is correlated with hearing loss in ears with an enlarged vestibular aqueduct

Kelly A. King, Byung Yoon Choi, Christopher Zalewski, Anne C. Madeo, Ani Manichaikul, Shannon P. Pryor, Anne Ferruggiaro, David Eisenman, H. Jeffrey Kim, John Niparko, James Thomsen, John A. Butman, Andrew J. Griffith, Carmen C. Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: Identify correlations among SLC26A4 genotype, cochlear structural anomalies, and hearing loss associated with enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA). Study Design: Prospective cohort survey, National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, a federal biomedical research facility. Methods: Eighty-three individuals, 11 months to 59 years of age, with EVA in at least one ear were studied. Correlations among pure-tone hearing thresholds, number of mutant SLC26A4 alleles, and the presence of cochlear anomalies detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging were examined. Results: Linear mixed-effects model indicated significantly poorer hearing in ears with EVA in individuals with two mutant alleles of SLC26A4 than in those with EVA and a single mutant allele (P = .012) or no mutant alleles (P = .007) in this gene. There was no detectable relationship between degree of hearing loss and the presence of structural cochlear anomalies. Conclusions: The number of mutant alleles of SLC26A4, but not the presence of cochlear anomalies, has a significant association with severity of hearing loss in ears with EVA. This information will be useful for prognostic counseling of patients and families with EVA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)384-389
Number of pages6
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Enlarged vestibular aqueduct
  • Hearing
  • SLC26A4

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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