Skin microvascular and metabolic response to sitting and pressure relief maneuvers in people with spinal cord injury

Suzanne L. Groah, Jessica Ramella-Roman, Alexander Libin, Manon Maitland Schladen, Alison Lichy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pressure ulcers (PUs) continue to be prevalent despite technologic advances in equipment development and repeated attempts to improve education and preventive efforts. Diligence and timeliness of adequate pressure relief are felt to be the cornerstone to PU prevention. The evidence supporting clinical recommendations for pressure relief is lacking, however, leading to inconsistencies in clinical guidelines. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the evidence base on PU pathophysiology and prevention in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) by delineating the microvascular mechanisms that occur during sitting and pressure relief maneuvers, including perfusion, oxygenation, and interface pressure. By understanding these key physiologic responses, health care professionals and consumers with SCI will be enabled to more effectively prevent the onset of PUs. The overriding goal of this project is to develop an algorithm that will assist clinicians in providing individualized recommendations specifying optimal pressure relief technique, duration, and frequency to reduce PU incidence in consumers with SCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-45
Number of pages13
JournalTopics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • pressure relief
  • pressure ulcer
  • pressure ulcer prevention
  • spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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