Size at birth, weight gain in infancy and childhood, and adult blood pressure in 5 low- and middle-income-country cohorts

When does weight gain matter?

Linda S. Adair, Reynaldo Martorell, Aryeh D. Stein, Pedro C. Hallal, Harshpal S. Sachdev, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, Andrew K. Wills, Shane A. Norris, Darren L. Dahly, Nanette R. Lee, Cesar G. Victora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Promoting catch-up growth in malnourished children has health benefits, but recent evidence suggests that accelerated child weight gain increases adult chronic disease risk. Objective: We aimed to determine how birth weight (BW) and weight gain to midchildhood relate to blood pressure (BP) in young adults. Design: We pooled data from birth cohorts in Brazil, Guatemala, India, the Philippines, and South Africa. We used conditional weight (CW), a residual of current weight regressed on prior weights, to represent deviations from expected weight gain from 0 to 12, 12 to 24, 24 to 48 mo, and 48 mo to adulthood. Adult BP and risk of prehypertension or hypertension (P/HTN) were modeled before and after adjustment for adult body mass index (BMI) and height. Interactions of CWs with small size-for-gestational age (SGA) at birth were tested. Results: Higher CWs were associated with increased BP and odds of P/HTN, with coefficients proportional to the contribution of each CW to adult BMI. Adjusted for adult height and BMI, no child CW was associated with adult BP, but 1 SD of BW was related to a 0.5-mm Hg lower systolic BP and a 9% lower odds of P/HTN. BW and CW associations with systolic BP and P/HTN were not different between adults born SGA and those with normal BW, but higher CW at 48 mo was associated with higher diastolic BP in those born SGA. Conclusions: Greater weight gain at any age relates to elevated adult BP, but faster weight gains in infancy and young childhood do not pose a higher risk than do gains at other ages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1383-1392
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume89
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Birth Weight
Weight Gain
Blood Pressure
Prehypertension
Weights and Measures
Hypertension
Gestational Age
Body Mass Index
Parturition
Guatemala
Philippines
Insurance Benefits
South Africa
Brazil
India
Young Adult
Chronic Disease
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Size at birth, weight gain in infancy and childhood, and adult blood pressure in 5 low- and middle-income-country cohorts : When does weight gain matter? / Adair, Linda S.; Martorell, Reynaldo; Stein, Aryeh D.; Hallal, Pedro C.; Sachdev, Harshpal S.; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Wills, Andrew K.; Norris, Shane A.; Dahly, Darren L.; Lee, Nanette R.; Victora, Cesar G.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 89, No. 5, 05.01.2009, p. 1383-1392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adair, LS, Martorell, R, Stein, AD, Hallal, PC, Sachdev, HS, Prabhakaran, D, Wills, AK, Norris, SA, Dahly, DL, Lee, NR & Victora, CG 2009, 'Size at birth, weight gain in infancy and childhood, and adult blood pressure in 5 low- and middle-income-country cohorts: When does weight gain matter?', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 5, pp. 1383-1392. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27139
Adair, Linda S. ; Martorell, Reynaldo ; Stein, Aryeh D. ; Hallal, Pedro C. ; Sachdev, Harshpal S. ; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj ; Wills, Andrew K. ; Norris, Shane A. ; Dahly, Darren L. ; Lee, Nanette R. ; Victora, Cesar G. / Size at birth, weight gain in infancy and childhood, and adult blood pressure in 5 low- and middle-income-country cohorts : When does weight gain matter?. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2009 ; Vol. 89, No. 5. pp. 1383-1392.
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abstract = "Background: Promoting catch-up growth in malnourished children has health benefits, but recent evidence suggests that accelerated child weight gain increases adult chronic disease risk. Objective: We aimed to determine how birth weight (BW) and weight gain to midchildhood relate to blood pressure (BP) in young adults. Design: We pooled data from birth cohorts in Brazil, Guatemala, India, the Philippines, and South Africa. We used conditional weight (CW), a residual of current weight regressed on prior weights, to represent deviations from expected weight gain from 0 to 12, 12 to 24, 24 to 48 mo, and 48 mo to adulthood. Adult BP and risk of prehypertension or hypertension (P/HTN) were modeled before and after adjustment for adult body mass index (BMI) and height. Interactions of CWs with small size-for-gestational age (SGA) at birth were tested. Results: Higher CWs were associated with increased BP and odds of P/HTN, with coefficients proportional to the contribution of each CW to adult BMI. Adjusted for adult height and BMI, no child CW was associated with adult BP, but 1 SD of BW was related to a 0.5-mm Hg lower systolic BP and a 9{\%} lower odds of P/HTN. BW and CW associations with systolic BP and P/HTN were not different between adults born SGA and those with normal BW, but higher CW at 48 mo was associated with higher diastolic BP in those born SGA. Conclusions: Greater weight gain at any age relates to elevated adult BP, but faster weight gains in infancy and young childhood do not pose a higher risk than do gains at other ages.",
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T2 - When does weight gain matter?

AU - Adair, Linda S.

AU - Martorell, Reynaldo

AU - Stein, Aryeh D.

AU - Hallal, Pedro C.

AU - Sachdev, Harshpal S.

AU - Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

AU - Wills, Andrew K.

AU - Norris, Shane A.

AU - Dahly, Darren L.

AU - Lee, Nanette R.

AU - Victora, Cesar G.

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N2 - Background: Promoting catch-up growth in malnourished children has health benefits, but recent evidence suggests that accelerated child weight gain increases adult chronic disease risk. Objective: We aimed to determine how birth weight (BW) and weight gain to midchildhood relate to blood pressure (BP) in young adults. Design: We pooled data from birth cohorts in Brazil, Guatemala, India, the Philippines, and South Africa. We used conditional weight (CW), a residual of current weight regressed on prior weights, to represent deviations from expected weight gain from 0 to 12, 12 to 24, 24 to 48 mo, and 48 mo to adulthood. Adult BP and risk of prehypertension or hypertension (P/HTN) were modeled before and after adjustment for adult body mass index (BMI) and height. Interactions of CWs with small size-for-gestational age (SGA) at birth were tested. Results: Higher CWs were associated with increased BP and odds of P/HTN, with coefficients proportional to the contribution of each CW to adult BMI. Adjusted for adult height and BMI, no child CW was associated with adult BP, but 1 SD of BW was related to a 0.5-mm Hg lower systolic BP and a 9% lower odds of P/HTN. BW and CW associations with systolic BP and P/HTN were not different between adults born SGA and those with normal BW, but higher CW at 48 mo was associated with higher diastolic BP in those born SGA. Conclusions: Greater weight gain at any age relates to elevated adult BP, but faster weight gains in infancy and young childhood do not pose a higher risk than do gains at other ages.

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