Single unit analysis of auditory processing in squirrel monkey frontal cortex

J. D. Newman, D. F. Lindsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Clicks, tone bursts and species-specific vocalizations were used to test 315 units isolated in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Acoustic responses were detected in about 20% of the units. Responsive units were scattered throughout the explored area, although more units responsive to vocalizations were found in the vicinity of sulcus principalis. Vocalizations were effective stimuli, driving 68% of the acoustic units. However, only 19% responded exclusively to vocalizations. Clicks were effective for 65% the acoustic units, 27% of which responded only to clicks. Tones activated 39% of the acoustic units. Units generally responded to tones over a wide frequency range. Responses to tones, clicks and vocalizations were similar, both within the same unit and between units. The biggest difference related to the background activity of the unit: Low rate cells produced a small number of relatively well-timed discharges per stimulus; high rate cells produced a longer, more poorly-timed response. Vocalizations differed in their effectiveness according to their physical structure. Noisy calls elicited 69% of all responses, although they accounted for only one-third of the test vocalizations. We conclude that frontal acoustic units are involved with at least two functional mechanisms, one related to attending to a large class of sounds, the other related to the detection of sounds with high motivational significance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-181
Number of pages13
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Saimiri
Frontal Lobe
Acoustics
Prefrontal Cortex

Keywords

  • Auditory
  • Cortex
  • Frontal
  • Primate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Single unit analysis of auditory processing in squirrel monkey frontal cortex. / Newman, J. D.; Lindsley, D. F.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 25, No. 2, 05.1976, p. 169-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman, J. D. ; Lindsley, D. F. / Single unit analysis of auditory processing in squirrel monkey frontal cortex. In: Experimental Brain Research. 1976 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 169-181.
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