Single site laparoscopic gastrostomy with a 4-mm bronchoscopic optical grasper

Todd A. Ponsky, Jeff R. Lukish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a common technique for gastrostomy placement. However, certain children may not be candidates for PEG, such as those with craniofacial or foregut anomalies and prior surgery. Laparoscopic gastrostomy has also gained popularity, but this requires 2 or 3 trocar sites. The use of a larger single operating laparoscope or multiple-port laparoscopic techniques may not be practical in small children and infants. We describe a simple technique for gastrostomy tube placement in infants using a 4-mm operative bronchoscope. A 1.4-kg infant with a cleft palate and hypotonia underwent general anesthesia. A 5-mm laparoscopic port was placed in the left upper quadrant at the site of the intended gastrostomy. Following pneumoperitoneum, a 4-mm bronchoscopic optical grasper was inserted into the abdomen via the single port. The stomach was grasped and pulled out through the port site. The extracorporeal portion of stomach was matured as a gastrostomy. A low-profile gastrostomy button was placed. Proper position of the gastrostomy device was verified intraoperatively using dye. At 2 months follow-up, the child and gastrostomy are without complication. This technique is minimally invasive and provides direct visualization through one 5-mm abdominal port without the requirement of endoscopy and blind percutaneous entrance into the abdominal cavity. This single-site laparoscopic gastrostomy may be a practical alternative for infants who may not be candidates for PEG or larger single-port operating systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-414
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastrostomy
Stomach
Laparoscopes
Bronchoscopes
Pneumoperitoneum
Muscle Hypotonia
Abdominal Cavity
Cleft Palate
Surgical Instruments
Abdomen
General Anesthesia
Endoscopy
Coloring Agents

Keywords

  • Gastrostomy
  • Laparoscopy
  • PEG
  • Single-port access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Single site laparoscopic gastrostomy with a 4-mm bronchoscopic optical grasper. / Ponsky, Todd A.; Lukish, Jeff R.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 43, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 412-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ponsky, Todd A. ; Lukish, Jeff R. / Single site laparoscopic gastrostomy with a 4-mm bronchoscopic optical grasper. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 412-414.
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