Single nucleotide polymorphisms in inflammation-related genes and mortality in a community-based cohort in Washington County, Maryland

Lisa Gallicchio, Howard Chang, Dana K. Christo, Lucy Thuita, Han Yao Huang, Paul Strickland, Ingo Ruczinski, Sandra C. Hoffman, Kathy J. Helzlsouer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes controlling inflammatory processes and mortality. Data were analyzed from 9,933 individuals who participated in two large community-based cohort studies conducted in Washington County, Maryland, in 1974 and 1989, designated "CLUE I" and "CLUE II," respectively. DNA from blood collected in 1989 was genotyped for 47 SNPs in 23 inflammation-related genes, including interferon-γ (IFNγ), lymphotoxin-α (LTα), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), C-reactive protein (CRP), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). All participants were followed from 1989 to the date of death or to June 20, 2005. The results showed no observable patterns of association for the SNPs and the all-cause and cause-specific mortality outcomes, although statistically significant associations were observed between at least one mortality outcome and SNPs in eNOS (reference SNP (rs) 1799983), PPARG (rs4684847), CRP (rs2794521), IFNγ (rs2069705), TNFα (rs1799964), and LTα (rs2229094). Additionally, three of the four examined CRP SNPs were strongly associated with CRP serum concentration among those with CRP measurements. The authors' findings from this community-based prospective cohort study suggest that the selected SNPs are not associated with overall or cause-specific death, although CRP genotypes may be associated with systemic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-813
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume167
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Cohort studies
  • Inflammation
  • Mortality
  • Neoplasms
  • Polymorphism, genetic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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