Single cell origin of multilineage colonies in culture. Evidence that differentiation of multipotent progenitors and restriction of proliferative potential of monopotent progenitors are stochastic processes

A. G. Leary, M. Ogawa, L. C. Strauss, C. I. Civin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we report analysis of differentiation in human hemopoietic colonies derived from a single cell. Cord blood mononuclear cells and panned My-10 antigen-positive bone marrow and cord blood cells were plated in methylcellulose medium containing erythropoietin and conditioned medium. Initially, we performed mapping studies to identify candidate colony-forming cells. Subsequently, using a micromanipulator, we transferred single cells individually to 35-mm dishes for analysis of colony formation. Cellular composition of the colony was determined by identifying all of the cells in the May-Grunwald-Giemsa stained preparation. Of 150 single candidate cells replated, 63 produced colonies. The incidences of single lineage colonies included 19 erythroid, 17 monocyte-macrophage, and 9 eosinophil colonies. There were 18 mixed hemopoietic colonies consisting of cells in two, three, four, and five lineages in varying combinations. In some instances, we noted the predominance of one lineage and the presence of very small populations of cells in a second or third lineage. These results provide evidence for the single-cell origin of human multilineage hemopoietic colonies, and are consistent with the stochastic model of stem cell differentiation in man. They also indicate that restriction of the proliferative potential of committed progenitors is a stochastic process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2193-2197
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume74
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Stochastic Processes
Fetal Blood
Blood Cells
Methylcellulose
Conditioned Culture Medium
Erythropoietin
Eosinophils
Monocytes
Cell Differentiation
Stem Cells
Bone Marrow
Macrophages
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Single cell origin of multilineage colonies in culture. Evidence that differentiation of multipotent progenitors and restriction of proliferative potential of monopotent progenitors are stochastic processes",
abstract = "In this paper, we report analysis of differentiation in human hemopoietic colonies derived from a single cell. Cord blood mononuclear cells and panned My-10 antigen-positive bone marrow and cord blood cells were plated in methylcellulose medium containing erythropoietin and conditioned medium. Initially, we performed mapping studies to identify candidate colony-forming cells. Subsequently, using a micromanipulator, we transferred single cells individually to 35-mm dishes for analysis of colony formation. Cellular composition of the colony was determined by identifying all of the cells in the May-Grunwald-Giemsa stained preparation. Of 150 single candidate cells replated, 63 produced colonies. The incidences of single lineage colonies included 19 erythroid, 17 monocyte-macrophage, and 9 eosinophil colonies. There were 18 mixed hemopoietic colonies consisting of cells in two, three, four, and five lineages in varying combinations. In some instances, we noted the predominance of one lineage and the presence of very small populations of cells in a second or third lineage. These results provide evidence for the single-cell origin of human multilineage hemopoietic colonies, and are consistent with the stochastic model of stem cell differentiation in man. They also indicate that restriction of the proliferative potential of committed progenitors is a stochastic process.",
author = "Leary, {A. G.} and M. Ogawa and Strauss, {L. C.} and Civin, {C. I.}",
year = "1984",
language = "English (US)",
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pages = "2193--2197",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Investigation",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Single cell origin of multilineage colonies in culture. Evidence that differentiation of multipotent progenitors and restriction of proliferative potential of monopotent progenitors are stochastic processes

AU - Leary, A. G.

AU - Ogawa, M.

AU - Strauss, L. C.

AU - Civin, C. I.

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - In this paper, we report analysis of differentiation in human hemopoietic colonies derived from a single cell. Cord blood mononuclear cells and panned My-10 antigen-positive bone marrow and cord blood cells were plated in methylcellulose medium containing erythropoietin and conditioned medium. Initially, we performed mapping studies to identify candidate colony-forming cells. Subsequently, using a micromanipulator, we transferred single cells individually to 35-mm dishes for analysis of colony formation. Cellular composition of the colony was determined by identifying all of the cells in the May-Grunwald-Giemsa stained preparation. Of 150 single candidate cells replated, 63 produced colonies. The incidences of single lineage colonies included 19 erythroid, 17 monocyte-macrophage, and 9 eosinophil colonies. There were 18 mixed hemopoietic colonies consisting of cells in two, three, four, and five lineages in varying combinations. In some instances, we noted the predominance of one lineage and the presence of very small populations of cells in a second or third lineage. These results provide evidence for the single-cell origin of human multilineage hemopoietic colonies, and are consistent with the stochastic model of stem cell differentiation in man. They also indicate that restriction of the proliferative potential of committed progenitors is a stochastic process.

AB - In this paper, we report analysis of differentiation in human hemopoietic colonies derived from a single cell. Cord blood mononuclear cells and panned My-10 antigen-positive bone marrow and cord blood cells were plated in methylcellulose medium containing erythropoietin and conditioned medium. Initially, we performed mapping studies to identify candidate colony-forming cells. Subsequently, using a micromanipulator, we transferred single cells individually to 35-mm dishes for analysis of colony formation. Cellular composition of the colony was determined by identifying all of the cells in the May-Grunwald-Giemsa stained preparation. Of 150 single candidate cells replated, 63 produced colonies. The incidences of single lineage colonies included 19 erythroid, 17 monocyte-macrophage, and 9 eosinophil colonies. There were 18 mixed hemopoietic colonies consisting of cells in two, three, four, and five lineages in varying combinations. In some instances, we noted the predominance of one lineage and the presence of very small populations of cells in a second or third lineage. These results provide evidence for the single-cell origin of human multilineage hemopoietic colonies, and are consistent with the stochastic model of stem cell differentiation in man. They also indicate that restriction of the proliferative potential of committed progenitors is a stochastic process.

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