Simple Outpatient Postoperative Analgesia Using an Orbital Catheter after Enucleation

Shannath L Merbs, Michael Grant, Nicholas T. Iliff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate an indwelling orbital catheter, placed at enucleation, for repeatable delivery of local anesthetic on an outpatient basis. Methods: A retrospective, noncomparative, case series medical record review was performed of patients undergoing enucleation and receiving an indwelling orbital pain-control catheter at surgery by us from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2001. Medical records were reviewed for hospitalization status postoperatively. Medical records of those patients treated on an outpatient basis were reviewed for patient and family comments about ease of use of the pain-control catheter and the degree of pain control and for any complications associated with catheter use. The main outcome measures included documented patient and family comments and physician medical record notes about catheter use and complications. Results: Of the 85 patients, 67 were treated on an outpatient basis. The other 18 patients required a postoperative hospital admission for unassociated medical problems. Of the 67 patients, 58 (87%) reported using the catheter at home at least once. Of these 58 patients, 10 reported mild discomfort with catheter use, but in no case did the patient discontinue catheter use because of discomfort. All patients using the catheter reported pain relief lasting from 11/2 to 4 hours. No postoperative complications associated with catheter placement were observed. Conclusion: The orbital pain-control catheter allows a caregiver to easily and repeatedly deliver local anesthetic to the operative site following enucleation, resulting in effective postoperative analgesia while the patient recovers at home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-352
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume122
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

Analgesia
Outpatients
Catheters
Medical Records
Pain
Local Anesthetics
Indwelling Catheters
Family Physicians
Caregivers
Hospitalization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Simple Outpatient Postoperative Analgesia Using an Orbital Catheter after Enucleation. / Merbs, Shannath L; Grant, Michael; Iliff, Nicholas T.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 122, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 349-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5ed82f8159ef468fb282a676353614ef,
title = "Simple Outpatient Postoperative Analgesia Using an Orbital Catheter after Enucleation",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate an indwelling orbital catheter, placed at enucleation, for repeatable delivery of local anesthetic on an outpatient basis. Methods: A retrospective, noncomparative, case series medical record review was performed of patients undergoing enucleation and receiving an indwelling orbital pain-control catheter at surgery by us from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2001. Medical records were reviewed for hospitalization status postoperatively. Medical records of those patients treated on an outpatient basis were reviewed for patient and family comments about ease of use of the pain-control catheter and the degree of pain control and for any complications associated with catheter use. The main outcome measures included documented patient and family comments and physician medical record notes about catheter use and complications. Results: Of the 85 patients, 67 were treated on an outpatient basis. The other 18 patients required a postoperative hospital admission for unassociated medical problems. Of the 67 patients, 58 (87{\%}) reported using the catheter at home at least once. Of these 58 patients, 10 reported mild discomfort with catheter use, but in no case did the patient discontinue catheter use because of discomfort. All patients using the catheter reported pain relief lasting from 11/2 to 4 hours. No postoperative complications associated with catheter placement were observed. Conclusion: The orbital pain-control catheter allows a caregiver to easily and repeatedly deliver local anesthetic to the operative site following enucleation, resulting in effective postoperative analgesia while the patient recovers at home.",
author = "Merbs, {Shannath L} and Michael Grant and Iliff, {Nicholas T.}",
year = "2004",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1001/archopht.122.3.349",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "122",
pages = "349--352",
journal = "JAMA Ophthalmology",
issn = "2168-6165",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Simple Outpatient Postoperative Analgesia Using an Orbital Catheter after Enucleation

AU - Merbs, Shannath L

AU - Grant, Michael

AU - Iliff, Nicholas T.

PY - 2004/3

Y1 - 2004/3

N2 - Objective: To evaluate an indwelling orbital catheter, placed at enucleation, for repeatable delivery of local anesthetic on an outpatient basis. Methods: A retrospective, noncomparative, case series medical record review was performed of patients undergoing enucleation and receiving an indwelling orbital pain-control catheter at surgery by us from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2001. Medical records were reviewed for hospitalization status postoperatively. Medical records of those patients treated on an outpatient basis were reviewed for patient and family comments about ease of use of the pain-control catheter and the degree of pain control and for any complications associated with catheter use. The main outcome measures included documented patient and family comments and physician medical record notes about catheter use and complications. Results: Of the 85 patients, 67 were treated on an outpatient basis. The other 18 patients required a postoperative hospital admission for unassociated medical problems. Of the 67 patients, 58 (87%) reported using the catheter at home at least once. Of these 58 patients, 10 reported mild discomfort with catheter use, but in no case did the patient discontinue catheter use because of discomfort. All patients using the catheter reported pain relief lasting from 11/2 to 4 hours. No postoperative complications associated with catheter placement were observed. Conclusion: The orbital pain-control catheter allows a caregiver to easily and repeatedly deliver local anesthetic to the operative site following enucleation, resulting in effective postoperative analgesia while the patient recovers at home.

AB - Objective: To evaluate an indwelling orbital catheter, placed at enucleation, for repeatable delivery of local anesthetic on an outpatient basis. Methods: A retrospective, noncomparative, case series medical record review was performed of patients undergoing enucleation and receiving an indwelling orbital pain-control catheter at surgery by us from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2001. Medical records were reviewed for hospitalization status postoperatively. Medical records of those patients treated on an outpatient basis were reviewed for patient and family comments about ease of use of the pain-control catheter and the degree of pain control and for any complications associated with catheter use. The main outcome measures included documented patient and family comments and physician medical record notes about catheter use and complications. Results: Of the 85 patients, 67 were treated on an outpatient basis. The other 18 patients required a postoperative hospital admission for unassociated medical problems. Of the 67 patients, 58 (87%) reported using the catheter at home at least once. Of these 58 patients, 10 reported mild discomfort with catheter use, but in no case did the patient discontinue catheter use because of discomfort. All patients using the catheter reported pain relief lasting from 11/2 to 4 hours. No postoperative complications associated with catheter placement were observed. Conclusion: The orbital pain-control catheter allows a caregiver to easily and repeatedly deliver local anesthetic to the operative site following enucleation, resulting in effective postoperative analgesia while the patient recovers at home.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1542288073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1542288073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archopht.122.3.349

DO - 10.1001/archopht.122.3.349

M3 - Article

C2 - 15006848

AN - SCOPUS:1542288073

VL - 122

SP - 349

EP - 352

JO - JAMA Ophthalmology

JF - JAMA Ophthalmology

SN - 2168-6165

IS - 3

ER -