Similar levels of urological symptoms have similar impact on Scottish and American men - Although Scots report less symptoms

H. A. Guess, C. G. Chute, W. M. Garraway, C. J. Girman, L. A. Panser, R. J. Lee, S. J. Jacobsen, G. B. McKelvie, J. E. Oesterling, M. M. Lieber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Urinary symptoms and the extent to which they interfere with living activities were compared in 2 community-based investigations that enrolled men 40 to 79 years old who were randomly sampled from Olmsted County, Minnesota (2,119) and the Forth Valley of Scotland (1,385). Both investigations included symptom questions with wording that is nearly identical to that of the American Urological Association (AUA) symptom index. Following AUA scoring conventions we grouped scores into mild (AUA score 0 to 7), moderate (score 8 to 19) and severe (score 20+) categories. Minnesota men had symptoms that were more frequent, more bothersome and caused greater interference with living activities than did Scottish men of comparable age (p <0.0002). However, within each symptom score category, the extent to which symptoms interfered with living activities was essentially the same in both populations. Although there appear to be important differences in urinary symptom prevalence between Scotland and Minnesota, the AUA symptom index provides a consistent measure of the extent to which urinary symptoms interfere with living activities in both populations. These findings support use of the AUA symptom index in the diagnostic evaluation of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1701-1705
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume150
Issue number5 II
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • prostate
  • prostatic hypertrophy
  • urinary tract
  • urination disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Similar levels of urological symptoms have similar impact on Scottish and American men - Although Scots report less symptoms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this