Signal transduction by reactive oxygen species

Toren Finkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although historically viewed as purely harmful, recent evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as important physiological regulators of intracellular signaling pathways. The specific effects of ROS are modulated in large part through the covalent modification of specific cysteine residues found within redox-sensitive target proteins. Oxidation of these specific and reactive cysteine residues in turn can lead to the reversible modification of enzymatic activity. Emerging evidence suggests that ROS regulate diverse physiological parameters ranging from the response to growth factor stimulation to the generation of the inflammatory response, and that dysregulated ROS signaling may contribute to a host of human diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-15
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cell Biology
Volume194
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Reactive Oxygen Species
Signal Transduction
Cysteine
Oxidation-Reduction
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Signal transduction by reactive oxygen species. / Finkel, Toren.

In: Journal of Cell Biology, Vol. 194, No. 1, 11.07.2011, p. 7-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Finkel, Toren. / Signal transduction by reactive oxygen species. In: Journal of Cell Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 194, No. 1. pp. 7-15.
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