Sickle cell retinopathy and hemoglobinopathies

Gerard A. Lutty, Jan Van Meurs, Alan C. Bird, Susan M. Downes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Sickle cell hemoglobinopathies all share the common feature of an abnormal globin chain, which leads to sickling of erythrocytes and obstruction of the microcirculation. Sickle vaso-occlusive events are insidious and affect virtually every vascular bed in the eye, often with visually devastating consequences. Vaso-occlusion most profoundly affects the retina, the light-sensitive tissue that lines the inside wall of the posterior aspect of the eye, because it is exquisitely sensitive to deprivation of oxygen. Even temporary vaso-occlusion, if longer than about 1.5-2 h, can result in permanent infarction of the retina. Most, if not all, of the complications of sickle cell disease in retina originate from the vaso-occlusive processes. The pathological changes can be divided into nonproliferative and proliferative events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRetinal Vascular Disease
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages700-734
Number of pages35
ISBN (Print)9783540295419
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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