Shoulder immobilization devices.

Edward G McFarland, L. A. Curl, M. W. Urquhart, K. Kellam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Currently a myriad of devices are available for immobilization of the injured or postsurgical upper extremity. Some of these devices are straightforward and easily used, but some are more complicated and require more familiarity for their successful application. However, even simple devices have the potential for misapplication and thus prevent their benefit to the patient. This article is the third in a 3-part series. The goals of the series are (1) to present and review several devices on the market used by shoulder surgeons to immobilize the upper extremity, and (2) to discuss proper application and precautions of their use. It is intended that this series will benefit nurses, therapists, and trainers involved in the use of these devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-54
Number of pages8
JournalOrthopaedic nursing / National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses
Volume16
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 1997

Fingerprint

Immobilization
Equipment and Supplies
Upper Extremity
Nurses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Shoulder immobilization devices. / McFarland, Edward G; Curl, L. A.; Urquhart, M. W.; Kellam, K.

In: Orthopaedic nursing / National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses, Vol. 16, No. 6, 11.1997, p. 47-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McFarland, EG, Curl, LA, Urquhart, MW & Kellam, K 1997, 'Shoulder immobilization devices.', Orthopaedic nursing / National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 47-54.
McFarland, Edward G ; Curl, L. A. ; Urquhart, M. W. ; Kellam, K. / Shoulder immobilization devices. In: Orthopaedic nursing / National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses. 1997 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 47-54.
@article{4f6f8be958ab462d8d348e79074a5148,
title = "Shoulder immobilization devices.",
abstract = "Currently a myriad of devices are available for immobilization of the injured or postsurgical upper extremity. Some of these devices are straightforward and easily used, but some are more complicated and require more familiarity for their successful application. However, even simple devices have the potential for misapplication and thus prevent their benefit to the patient. This article is the third in a 3-part series. The goals of the series are (1) to present and review several devices on the market used by shoulder surgeons to immobilize the upper extremity, and (2) to discuss proper application and precautions of their use. It is intended that this series will benefit nurses, therapists, and trainers involved in the use of these devices.",
author = "McFarland, {Edward G} and Curl, {L. A.} and Urquhart, {M. W.} and K. Kellam",
year = "1997",
month = "11",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "47--54",
journal = "Orthopaedic Nursing",
issn = "0744-6020",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shoulder immobilization devices.

AU - McFarland, Edward G

AU - Curl, L. A.

AU - Urquhart, M. W.

AU - Kellam, K.

PY - 1997/11

Y1 - 1997/11

N2 - Currently a myriad of devices are available for immobilization of the injured or postsurgical upper extremity. Some of these devices are straightforward and easily used, but some are more complicated and require more familiarity for their successful application. However, even simple devices have the potential for misapplication and thus prevent their benefit to the patient. This article is the third in a 3-part series. The goals of the series are (1) to present and review several devices on the market used by shoulder surgeons to immobilize the upper extremity, and (2) to discuss proper application and precautions of their use. It is intended that this series will benefit nurses, therapists, and trainers involved in the use of these devices.

AB - Currently a myriad of devices are available for immobilization of the injured or postsurgical upper extremity. Some of these devices are straightforward and easily used, but some are more complicated and require more familiarity for their successful application. However, even simple devices have the potential for misapplication and thus prevent their benefit to the patient. This article is the third in a 3-part series. The goals of the series are (1) to present and review several devices on the market used by shoulder surgeons to immobilize the upper extremity, and (2) to discuss proper application and precautions of their use. It is intended that this series will benefit nurses, therapists, and trainers involved in the use of these devices.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031265238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031265238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9416157

AN - SCOPUS:0031265238

VL - 16

SP - 47

EP - 54

JO - Orthopaedic Nursing

JF - Orthopaedic Nursing

SN - 0744-6020

IS - 6

ER -