Should the Dose of Antiplatelet Drugs Be Adjusted for Body Weight? the Example of Vorapaxar

Victor L. Serebruany, Seth D. Fortmann, Moo Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In contrast to the vast majority of pharmaceuticals on the market, antiplatelet agents are widely prescribed in a uniform, 'one size fits all' manner, without conventional dose adjustments. However, strong evidence yielded from clinical trials repeatedly suggests that patients with a low body weight (LBW), the elderly and those with renal or hepatic impairment may benefit from reduced doses, while younger, heavier patients, males and diabetics may benefit from a dose escalation. Vorapaxar, a thrombin protease-activated receptor-1 inhibitor, has been tested in the TRA2P and TRACER clinical trials, but its efficacy and safety in patients with a LBW is unclear. Objective: To determine the impact of LBW on primary end point rates (PER) and bleeding risk after vorapaxar, as yielded from the TRA2P and TRACER secondary FDA review. Results: The LBW (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-72
Number of pages4
JournalCardiology
Volume133
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Body Weight
Clinical Trials
PAR-1 Receptor
Patient Safety
Thrombin
Hemorrhage
Kidney
vorapaxar
Liver
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Bleeding
  • Body weight
  • Dose adjustment
  • Vorapaxar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Should the Dose of Antiplatelet Drugs Be Adjusted for Body Weight? the Example of Vorapaxar. / Serebruany, Victor L.; Fortmann, Seth D.; Hyun Kim, Moo.

In: Cardiology, Vol. 133, No. 2, 01.01.2016, p. 69-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Serebruany, Victor L. ; Fortmann, Seth D. ; Hyun Kim, Moo. / Should the Dose of Antiplatelet Drugs Be Adjusted for Body Weight? the Example of Vorapaxar. In: Cardiology. 2016 ; Vol. 133, No. 2. pp. 69-72.
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