Short report

Modulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by Plasmodium in the murine model

Cherise P. Scott, Nirbhay Kumar, William Ramses Bishai, Yukari C Manabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A large proportion of people with latent tuberculosis live in malaria-endemic areas, so co-infection with these two organisms is likely to be common. To determine whether there might be a biologic interaction between these two pathogens in vivo, we infected mice with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then with a non-lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii eight weeks later. Mice chronically infected with M. tuberculosis simulate the equilibrium between pathogen and host thought to exist in human latent infection. Co-infected mice were less able to contain growth of M. tuberculosis in lung, spleen, and liver (mean ± SEM log10 colony-forming units = 5.50 ± 0.11 versus 5.12 ± 0.08, 4.58 ± 0.07 versus 4.13 ± 0.10, and 2.86 ± 0.10 versus 2.49 ± 0.10, respectively) and had increased mortality. In populations where both diseases are endemic, there may be implications for increased incidence of clinically detectable tuberculosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-148
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2004

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Mycobacterium Infections
Plasmodium
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Plasmodium yoelii
Latent Tuberculosis
Endemic Diseases
Coinfection
Malaria
Tuberculosis
Stem Cells
Spleen
Lung
Mortality
Liver
Incidence
Growth
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Short report : Modulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by Plasmodium in the murine model. / Scott, Cherise P.; Kumar, Nirbhay; Bishai, William Ramses; Manabe, Yukari C.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 70, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 144-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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