Shift reagent enhanced concurrent 23 Na and 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of transcellular sodium distribution in the dog brain in vivo

Scott M. Eleff, Ian J. McLennan, Graeme K. Hart, Yuichi Maruki, Richard J. Traystman, Raymond C. Koehler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The intracellular to extracellular sodium distribution is one of the primary determinants of action potentials necessary for the electrical function of organs such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. The ability of shift reagent enhanced 23 Na MRS to directly measure the intracellular and extracellular sodium distribution in brain is controversial and centers on the relative contributions of bulk magnetic susceptibility and hyper‐fine interactions to the observed chemical shifts. In this study, infusion of dysprosium (111) triethylenetetraminehexacetate (Dy(TTHA) −3 ), resulted in a 23 Na MRS spectrum of dog brain with two well resolved peaks at 9 and 0.4 ppm. The 9 ppm peak corresponded to the resonance seen in aspirated blood. After disruption of the blood brain barrier, the single peak at 0.4 ppm split into two peaks at 3 and 0 ppm. The ability of Dy‐(lTHIA) −3 enhanced 23 Na MRS to follow global changes in brain sodium distribution was tested during cardiac arrest. The expected rapid Na influx into the intracellular space produced a marked decrease in the 3 ppm signal and a parallel increase in the 0 ppm peak. This is consistent with the assignment of the 3 ppm peak as interstitial sodium and the 0 ppm peak as intracellular sodium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-17
Number of pages7
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1993

Keywords

  • brain
  • dysprosium
  • ischemia
  • sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Shift reagent enhanced concurrent <sup>23</sup> Na and <sup>1</sup> H magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of transcellular sodium distribution in the dog brain in vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this