Shear forces during blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in human brain cells

Rea Ravin, Paul S. Blank, Alex Steinkamp, Shay M. Rappaport, Nitay Ravin, Ludmila Bezrukov, Hugo Guerrero-Cazares, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Sergey M. Bezrukov, Joshua Zimmerberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) describes a spectrum of injuries caused by an explosive force that results in changes in brain function. The mechanism responsible for primary bTBI following a blast shockwave remains unknown. We have developed a pneumatic device that delivers shockwaves, similar to those known to induce bTBI, within a chamber optimal for fluorescence microscopy. Abrupt changes in pressure can be created with and without the presence of shear forces at the surface of cells. In primary cultures of human central nervous system cells, the cellular calcium response to shockwaves alone was negligible. Even when the applied pressure reached 15 atm, there was no damage or excitation, unless concomitant shear forces, peaking between 0.3 to 0.7 Pa, were present at the cell surface. The probability of cellular injury in response to a shockwave was low and cell survival was unaffected 20 hours after shockwave exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere39421
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2012

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Human Activities
shear stress
Brain
Calcium
brain
calcium
Pressure
Wounds and Injuries
cells
Fluorescence Microscopy
Fluorescence microscopy
Cell Survival
Neurology
Central Nervous System
fluorescence microscopy
Pneumatics
central nervous system
cell viability
Equipment and Supplies
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ravin, R., Blank, P. S., Steinkamp, A., Rappaport, S. M., Ravin, N., Bezrukov, L., ... Zimmerberg, J. (2012). Shear forces during blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in human brain cells. PLoS One, 7(6), [e39421]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039421

Shear forces during blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in human brain cells. / Ravin, Rea; Blank, Paul S.; Steinkamp, Alex; Rappaport, Shay M.; Ravin, Nitay; Bezrukov, Ludmila; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Zimmerberg, Joshua.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 6, e39421, 29.06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ravin, R, Blank, PS, Steinkamp, A, Rappaport, SM, Ravin, N, Bezrukov, L, Guerrero-Cazares, H, Quinones-Hinojosa, A, Bezrukov, SM & Zimmerberg, J 2012, 'Shear forces during blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in human brain cells', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 6, e39421. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039421
Ravin, Rea ; Blank, Paul S. ; Steinkamp, Alex ; Rappaport, Shay M. ; Ravin, Nitay ; Bezrukov, Ludmila ; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo ; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo ; Bezrukov, Sergey M. ; Zimmerberg, Joshua. / Shear forces during blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in human brain cells. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 6.
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