Sex disparities in procedure use for acute myocardial infarction in the United States, 1995 to 2001

Alain G. Bertoni, Denise E. Bonds, James Lovato, David C. Goff, Frederick L. Brancati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Sex disparities in procedure use for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have been well documented in selected populations in the 1980s and early 1990s. As little is known about more recent trends in sex disparities in the general population, we analyzed more recent rates of catheterization, angioplasty, and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) performed before discharge for acute myocardial infarction. Methods Data from representative civilian hospitals in 33 US states in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1995 to 2001 were used to identify men and women discharged with a primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Receipt of cardiac catheterization, angioplasty, stent placement, or CABG was determined. Multivariate Poisson modeling was used to determine the likelihood of procedure receipt by sex, adjusting for demographic, comorbidity, and hospital characteristics. Results From 1995 to 2001, the adjusted proportion receiving catheterization, angioplasty, and stents increased in women as well as men, whereas the adjusted proportion receiving CABG declined slightly. Women were nearly as likely as men to undergo catheterization (adjusted prevalence ratio [PR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.97), angioplasty (adjusted PR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97 to 0.99), or stent placement (adjusted PR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.97). Women remained less likely to undergo CABG (adjusted PR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.79). Conclusions These recent nationwide data suggest that compared with men, women are nearly as likely to undergo catheterization-based procedures but remain less likely to undergo CABG.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1054-1060
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume147
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004

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Coronary Artery Bypass
Angioplasty
Catheterization
Myocardial Infarction
Stents
Cardiac Catheterization
Population
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Sex disparities in procedure use for acute myocardial infarction in the United States, 1995 to 2001. / Bertoni, Alain G.; Bonds, Denise E.; Lovato, James; Goff, David C.; Brancati, Frederick L.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 147, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 1054-1060.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bertoni, Alain G. ; Bonds, Denise E. ; Lovato, James ; Goff, David C. ; Brancati, Frederick L. / Sex disparities in procedure use for acute myocardial infarction in the United States, 1995 to 2001. In: American Heart Journal. 2004 ; Vol. 147, No. 6. pp. 1054-1060.
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