Sex differences in school-aged children with pervasive attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Wade F. Horn, Anne E. Wagner, Nick Lalongo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated 54 children (37 boys and 17 girls) with cross-situational attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to determine whether there are sex differences in the expression of either the primary or secondary symptomatology of ADHD. Results indicated that the male and female ADHD groups were strikingly similar on all measures of primary (impulsivity, inattention, and overactivity) and secondary (learning problems, externalizing symptoms, internalizing symptoms, peer relationship difficulties, and self-perceptions) symptomatology included in this study. The lack of significant sex differences conflicts with prior reports in the literature, and these conflicting results are discussed in terms of differences in inclusion criteria. Implications for understanding the long-term outcome of ADHD in girls are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-125
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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