Sex and electroencephalographic synchronization after photic stimulation predict signal changes in the visual cortex on functional MR images

Peter Hedera, Dee Wu, Steve Collins, Jonathan S. Lewin, David Miller, Alan J. Lerner, Susan Klein, Robert P. Friedland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: We evaluated factors that influence MR signal changes during photic stimulation of the visual cortex. We also tested the hypothesis that functional MR imaging response corresponds to electroencephalographic (EEG) synchronization after photic stimulation. METHODS: Thirty-eight healthy subjects, 20 men and 18 women, underwent photic stimulation of the visual cortex. They were studied with a 1.5-T MR unit, and photic stimulation was induced via 8-Hz LED goggles. Seven subjects with and seven without detectable functional MR imaging response to photic stimulation underwent further studies with 16-channel EEG after 2-to 30-Hz stroboscopic stimulation. RESULTS: Thirteen men and 18 women had a significant increase in MR signal in the visual cortex; seven men showed no visual cortex activation during more than two repeated studies. Six of seven volunteers with increased functional MR imaging signal after photic stimulation also showed signs of EEG synchronization when an 8-Hz stroboscopic flash was used; six of seven subjects with no functional MR imaging lacked EEG synchronization at 8-Hz stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Men were more likely than women to have undetectable MR signal changes after photic stimulation. This finding should be considered when interpreting results of functional MR imaging studies. EEG with stroboscopic examination is a good predictor of functional MR imaging sensitivity to changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by sensory stimulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-857
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume19
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Photic Stimulation
Visual Cortex
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Eye Protective Devices
Regional Blood Flow
Volunteers
Healthy Volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Hedera, P., Wu, D., Collins, S., Lewin, J. S., Miller, D., Lerner, A. J., ... Friedland, R. P. (1998). Sex and electroencephalographic synchronization after photic stimulation predict signal changes in the visual cortex on functional MR images. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 19(5), 853-857.

Sex and electroencephalographic synchronization after photic stimulation predict signal changes in the visual cortex on functional MR images. / Hedera, Peter; Wu, Dee; Collins, Steve; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Miller, David; Lerner, Alan J.; Klein, Susan; Friedland, Robert P.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 19, No. 5, 05.1998, p. 853-857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hedera, P, Wu, D, Collins, S, Lewin, JS, Miller, D, Lerner, AJ, Klein, S & Friedland, RP 1998, 'Sex and electroencephalographic synchronization after photic stimulation predict signal changes in the visual cortex on functional MR images', American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 853-857.
Hedera, Peter ; Wu, Dee ; Collins, Steve ; Lewin, Jonathan S. ; Miller, David ; Lerner, Alan J. ; Klein, Susan ; Friedland, Robert P. / Sex and electroencephalographic synchronization after photic stimulation predict signal changes in the visual cortex on functional MR images. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 1998 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 853-857.
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