Service delivery interventions to increase uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision for HIV prevention: A systematic review

Kaitlyn Atkins, Ping Teresa Yeh, Caitlin E. Kennedy, Virginia A. Fonner, Michael D. Sweat, Kevin R. O’Reilly, Rachel Baggaley, George W. Rutherford, Julia Samuelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) remains an essential component of combination HIV prevention services, particularly in priority countries in sub-Saharan Africa. As VMMC programs seek to maximize impact and efficiency, and to support World Health Organization guidance, specific uptake-enhancing strategies are critical to identify. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature to evaluate the impact of service delivery interventions (e.g., facility layout, service co-location, mobile outreach) on VMMC uptake among adolescent and adult men. For the main effectiveness review, we searched for publications or conference abstracts that measured VMMC uptake or uptake of HIV testing or risk reduction counselling within VMMC services. We synthesized data by coding categories and outcomes. We also reviewed studies assessing acceptability, values/preferences, costs, and feasibility. Results Four randomized controlled trials and five observational studies were included in the effectiveness review. Studies took place in South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. They assessed a range of service delivery innovations, including community-, school-, and facility-based interventions. Overall, interventions increased VMMC uptake; some successfully improved uptake among age-specific subpopulations, but urban-rural stratification showed no clear trends. Interventions that increased adult men’s uptake included mobile services (compared to static facilities), home-based testing with active referral follow-up, and facility-based HIV testing with enhanced comprehensive sexual education. Six acceptability studies suggested interventions were generally perceived to help men choose to get circumcised. Eleven cost studies suggested interventions create economies-of-scale and efficiencies. Three studies suggested such interventions were feasible, improving facility preparedness, service quality and quantity, and efficiencies. Conclusions Innovative changes in male-centered VMMC services can improve adult men’s and adolescent boys’ VMMC uptake. Limited evidence on interventions that enhance access and acceptability show promising results, but evidence gaps persist due to inconsistent intervention definition and delivery, due in part to contextual relevance and limited age disaggregation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0227755
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

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Male Circumcision
systematic review
HIV
uptake mechanisms
Testing
Efficiency
Costs
Zambia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Zimbabwe
Innovation
Education
Uganda
Tanzania
Health
economies of scale
Africa South of the Sahara
outreach
Risk Reduction Behavior
counseling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Service delivery interventions to increase uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision for HIV prevention : A systematic review. / Atkins, Kaitlyn; Yeh, Ping Teresa; Kennedy, Caitlin E.; Fonner, Virginia A.; Sweat, Michael D.; O’Reilly, Kevin R.; Baggaley, Rachel; Rutherford, George W.; Samuelson, Julia.

In: PloS one, Vol. 15, No. 1, e0227755, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Atkins, Kaitlyn ; Yeh, Ping Teresa ; Kennedy, Caitlin E. ; Fonner, Virginia A. ; Sweat, Michael D. ; O’Reilly, Kevin R. ; Baggaley, Rachel ; Rutherford, George W. ; Samuelson, Julia. / Service delivery interventions to increase uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision for HIV prevention : A systematic review. In: PloS one. 2020 ; Vol. 15, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) remains an essential component of combination HIV prevention services, particularly in priority countries in sub-Saharan Africa. As VMMC programs seek to maximize impact and efficiency, and to support World Health Organization guidance, specific uptake-enhancing strategies are critical to identify. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature to evaluate the impact of service delivery interventions (e.g., facility layout, service co-location, mobile outreach) on VMMC uptake among adolescent and adult men. For the main effectiveness review, we searched for publications or conference abstracts that measured VMMC uptake or uptake of HIV testing or risk reduction counselling within VMMC services. We synthesized data by coding categories and outcomes. We also reviewed studies assessing acceptability, values/preferences, costs, and feasibility. Results Four randomized controlled trials and five observational studies were included in the effectiveness review. Studies took place in South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. They assessed a range of service delivery innovations, including community-, school-, and facility-based interventions. Overall, interventions increased VMMC uptake; some successfully improved uptake among age-specific subpopulations, but urban-rural stratification showed no clear trends. Interventions that increased adult men’s uptake included mobile services (compared to static facilities), home-based testing with active referral follow-up, and facility-based HIV testing with enhanced comprehensive sexual education. Six acceptability studies suggested interventions were generally perceived to help men choose to get circumcised. Eleven cost studies suggested interventions create economies-of-scale and efficiencies. Three studies suggested such interventions were feasible, improving facility preparedness, service quality and quantity, and efficiencies. Conclusions Innovative changes in male-centered VMMC services can improve adult men’s and adolescent boys’ VMMC uptake. Limited evidence on interventions that enhance access and acceptability show promising results, but evidence gaps persist due to inconsistent intervention definition and delivery, due in part to contextual relevance and limited age disaggregation.",
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AU - Sweat, Michael D.

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