Serum uric acid and chronic kidney disease: the Severance cohort study.

Yejin Mok, Sun Ju Lee, Myoung Soo Kim, Wenying Cui, Young Myoung Moon, Sun Ha Jee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Both serum uric acid (SUA) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease; however, it is unclear whether SUA independently increases the risk of CKD based on longitudinal data. To investigate the relationship between SUA levels and CKD development, we initiated a 10.2-year prospective cohort study. Data from 14 939 Koreans, 20-84 years of age, who completed a questionnaire and medical examination at the Severance Health Promotion Center were evaluated. The outcome of interest, CKD, was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of <60 mL/min/1.73m(2) via the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, controlling for age, life style and other cardiovascular risk factors, showed an increased risk of developing CKD for men [hazard ratio (HR) 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.9] and women (HR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.0-1.8) in the highest quartiles of SUA compared to their counterparts in the lowest quartiles. The relationship between SUA and CKD was linear and stepwise in men. The HRs for renal function Grade 2 (75-89.9 mL/min/1.73m(2)), Grade 3 (60-74.9 mL/min/1.73m(2)) and Grade 4 (<60 mL/min/1.73m(2)) increased with an increase in SUA quartiles as compared to the baseline GFR group (Grade 1, ≥90 mL/min/1.73m(2)). Higher SUA levels increased the risk of CKD, suggesting that at least part of the reported association between SUA and cardiovascular disease may be connected to CKD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1831-1835
Number of pages5
JournalNephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

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