Serum lipid response to oat product intake with a fat-modified diet

L. V. van Horn, K. Liu, Donna Parker, L. Emidy, Y. L. Liao, W. H. Pan, D. Giumetti, J. Hewitt, J. Stamler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Healthy adult volunteers (no. = 28), men and women aged 30 to 65 years, participated in a 12-week study on dietary fat modification plus oat production ingestion (60 gm/day) to test whether moderate daily intake of oat bran and oatmeal enhanced serum lipid response. During weeks 0 to 6, all participants followed the American Heart Association fat-modified eating style. At 6 weeks, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups. All participants continued to follow the fat-modified eating pattern; groups 1 and 2 were asked during weeks 7 to 12 to consume two servings of either oat bran or oatmeal per day, for a total of 60 gm/day isocalorically substituted for other carbohydrates. Group 3 ingested no oat products. At baseline, the group mean cholesterol level was 208.4 mg/dl. After 6 weeks of dietary fat intervention, the level was 197.6 - a fall of 10.8 mg/dl (5.2%). At 12 weeks, the mean serum cholesterol level fell further, by 5.6, 6.5, and 1.2 mg/dl for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Group mean weight loss was small - 1.9 lb during the first 6 weeks and 0.6 to 0.8 for the three groups during weeks 7 to 12. Reported oat product ingestion was 39 and 35 gm per person per day, respectively, for groups 1 and 2 (2.2 and 1.4 servings per person per day, respectively). Dietary fat composition remained similar among the three groups during weeks 7 to 12. Pooled results indicated that the addition of oat products at a moderate and practical level enhanced serum lipid response ( p <.05) to a fat-modified eating pattern among free-living adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-764
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume86
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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oat products
dietary fat
blood lipids
oatmeal
oat bran
Fats
ingestion
Diet
Lipids
eating habits
Eating
Dietary Fats
lipids
Serum
cholesterol
diet
volunteers
oats
weight loss
Cholesterol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

van Horn, L. V., Liu, K., Parker, D., Emidy, L., Liao, Y. L., Pan, W. H., ... Stamler, J. (1986). Serum lipid response to oat product intake with a fat-modified diet. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 86(6), 759-764.

Serum lipid response to oat product intake with a fat-modified diet. / van Horn, L. V.; Liu, K.; Parker, Donna; Emidy, L.; Liao, Y. L.; Pan, W. H.; Giumetti, D.; Hewitt, J.; Stamler, J.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 86, No. 6, 1986, p. 759-764.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van Horn, LV, Liu, K, Parker, D, Emidy, L, Liao, YL, Pan, WH, Giumetti, D, Hewitt, J & Stamler, J 1986, 'Serum lipid response to oat product intake with a fat-modified diet', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 86, no. 6, pp. 759-764.
van Horn, L. V. ; Liu, K. ; Parker, Donna ; Emidy, L. ; Liao, Y. L. ; Pan, W. H. ; Giumetti, D. ; Hewitt, J. ; Stamler, J. / Serum lipid response to oat product intake with a fat-modified diet. In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1986 ; Vol. 86, No. 6. pp. 759-764.
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