Serum levels of virus burden in early-stage human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease in women

James S. Evans, Theresa Nims, John Cooley, William Bradley, Linda Jagodzinski, Susan Zhou, Gregory P. Melcher, Donald S. Burke, Maryanne Vahey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The fundamental clinical, viral, and immunologic features of early- stage human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease were examined in a seroprevalent cohort of 28 men and 14 women assessed longitudinally at three equally dispersed time points over a mean of 43 months. There were no gender differences in the relative risk of developing AIDS-defining end points or death. The median serum RNA levels assessed at the three study time points were 3.3-, 4.9-, and 1.5-fold lower, respectively, in women than in men. This suggests that while serum virus load may be as powerful a correlate of disease status in women as it is in men, the absolute values of the virus levels may be different in the 2 populations. These observations may have implications for the interpretation of levels of virus burden in women for the assessment of disease progression, transmission, and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)795-800
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume175
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Evans, J. S., Nims, T., Cooley, J., Bradley, W., Jagodzinski, L., Zhou, S., Melcher, G. P., Burke, D. S., & Vahey, M. (1997). Serum levels of virus burden in early-stage human immunodeficiency virus type 1 disease in women. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 175(4), 795-800. https://doi.org/10.1086/513973