Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma: influence of tumor volume

Alan Wayne Partin, Stuart R. Criley, Mitchell S. Steiner, Kisseng Hsieh, Jonathan W. Simons, Jeanne Lumadue, H Ballentine Carter, Fray F. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. At present, 35% to 50% of patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) unpredictably have a recurrence after surgical therapy. Presently, no clinical serum marker exists to detect occult metastases and to allow measurement of response to therapy in RCC. Serum ferritin was previously reported to correlate with pathologic stage. We postulated that this increase in serum ferritin with increasing stage might reflect tumor volume, since higher stage tumors are often larger. Methods. Serum ferritin levels were measured preoperatively in 30 patients with radiologic evidence of RCC. Tumor volume and the largest tumor dimension were calculated from either the pathologic specimen (n = 24) or from the computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 30). Pathologic stage was determined for all patients undergoing surgery (T1 = 3, T2 = 12, and T3 = 9). Results. Preoperative serum ferritin levels did not correlate with age, blood urea nitrogen levels, creatinine levels, hematocrit, race, or gender. Although mean serum ferritin levels increased with increasing stage (T1 = 113 ± 75, T2 = 254 ± 270, and T3 = 425 ± 257 ng/mL), these differences did not reach statistical significance (P >0.05). Serum ferritin did, however, correlate with tumor volume (R = 0.75; P <0.0001) and the largest tumor dimension measured from radiographic studies (R = 0.8; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-217
Number of pages7
JournalUrology
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Ferritins
Tumor Burden
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Biomarkers
Serum
Neoplasms
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Hematocrit
Creatinine
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Partin, A. W., Criley, S. R., Steiner, M. S., Hsieh, K., Simons, J. W., Lumadue, J., ... Marshall, F. F. (1995). Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma: influence of tumor volume. Urology, 45(2), 211-217. https://doi.org/10.1016/0090-4295(95)80007-7

Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma : influence of tumor volume. / Partin, Alan Wayne; Criley, Stuart R.; Steiner, Mitchell S.; Hsieh, Kisseng; Simons, Jonathan W.; Lumadue, Jeanne; Carter, H Ballentine; Marshall, Fray F.

In: Urology, Vol. 45, No. 2, 1995, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Partin, AW, Criley, SR, Steiner, MS, Hsieh, K, Simons, JW, Lumadue, J, Carter, HB & Marshall, FF 1995, 'Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma: influence of tumor volume', Urology, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 211-217. https://doi.org/10.1016/0090-4295(95)80007-7
Partin, Alan Wayne ; Criley, Stuart R. ; Steiner, Mitchell S. ; Hsieh, Kisseng ; Simons, Jonathan W. ; Lumadue, Jeanne ; Carter, H Ballentine ; Marshall, Fray F. / Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma : influence of tumor volume. In: Urology. 1995 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 211-217.
@article{da105c28e17f43f9b416acaf5e695d28,
title = "Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma: influence of tumor volume",
abstract = "Objectives. At present, 35{\%} to 50{\%} of patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) unpredictably have a recurrence after surgical therapy. Presently, no clinical serum marker exists to detect occult metastases and to allow measurement of response to therapy in RCC. Serum ferritin was previously reported to correlate with pathologic stage. We postulated that this increase in serum ferritin with increasing stage might reflect tumor volume, since higher stage tumors are often larger. Methods. Serum ferritin levels were measured preoperatively in 30 patients with radiologic evidence of RCC. Tumor volume and the largest tumor dimension were calculated from either the pathologic specimen (n = 24) or from the computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 30). Pathologic stage was determined for all patients undergoing surgery (T1 = 3, T2 = 12, and T3 = 9). Results. Preoperative serum ferritin levels did not correlate with age, blood urea nitrogen levels, creatinine levels, hematocrit, race, or gender. Although mean serum ferritin levels increased with increasing stage (T1 = 113 ± 75, T2 = 254 ± 270, and T3 = 425 ± 257 ng/mL), these differences did not reach statistical significance (P >0.05). Serum ferritin did, however, correlate with tumor volume (R = 0.75; P <0.0001) and the largest tumor dimension measured from radiographic studies (R = 0.8; P",
author = "Partin, {Alan Wayne} and Criley, {Stuart R.} and Steiner, {Mitchell S.} and Kisseng Hsieh and Simons, {Jonathan W.} and Jeanne Lumadue and Carter, {H Ballentine} and Marshall, {Fray F.}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/0090-4295(95)80007-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "211--217",
journal = "Urology",
issn = "0090-4295",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serum ferritin as a clinical marker for renal cell carcinoma

T2 - influence of tumor volume

AU - Partin, Alan Wayne

AU - Criley, Stuart R.

AU - Steiner, Mitchell S.

AU - Hsieh, Kisseng

AU - Simons, Jonathan W.

AU - Lumadue, Jeanne

AU - Carter, H Ballentine

AU - Marshall, Fray F.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Objectives. At present, 35% to 50% of patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) unpredictably have a recurrence after surgical therapy. Presently, no clinical serum marker exists to detect occult metastases and to allow measurement of response to therapy in RCC. Serum ferritin was previously reported to correlate with pathologic stage. We postulated that this increase in serum ferritin with increasing stage might reflect tumor volume, since higher stage tumors are often larger. Methods. Serum ferritin levels were measured preoperatively in 30 patients with radiologic evidence of RCC. Tumor volume and the largest tumor dimension were calculated from either the pathologic specimen (n = 24) or from the computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 30). Pathologic stage was determined for all patients undergoing surgery (T1 = 3, T2 = 12, and T3 = 9). Results. Preoperative serum ferritin levels did not correlate with age, blood urea nitrogen levels, creatinine levels, hematocrit, race, or gender. Although mean serum ferritin levels increased with increasing stage (T1 = 113 ± 75, T2 = 254 ± 270, and T3 = 425 ± 257 ng/mL), these differences did not reach statistical significance (P >0.05). Serum ferritin did, however, correlate with tumor volume (R = 0.75; P <0.0001) and the largest tumor dimension measured from radiographic studies (R = 0.8; P

AB - Objectives. At present, 35% to 50% of patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) unpredictably have a recurrence after surgical therapy. Presently, no clinical serum marker exists to detect occult metastases and to allow measurement of response to therapy in RCC. Serum ferritin was previously reported to correlate with pathologic stage. We postulated that this increase in serum ferritin with increasing stage might reflect tumor volume, since higher stage tumors are often larger. Methods. Serum ferritin levels were measured preoperatively in 30 patients with radiologic evidence of RCC. Tumor volume and the largest tumor dimension were calculated from either the pathologic specimen (n = 24) or from the computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 30). Pathologic stage was determined for all patients undergoing surgery (T1 = 3, T2 = 12, and T3 = 9). Results. Preoperative serum ferritin levels did not correlate with age, blood urea nitrogen levels, creatinine levels, hematocrit, race, or gender. Although mean serum ferritin levels increased with increasing stage (T1 = 113 ± 75, T2 = 254 ± 270, and T3 = 425 ± 257 ng/mL), these differences did not reach statistical significance (P >0.05). Serum ferritin did, however, correlate with tumor volume (R = 0.75; P <0.0001) and the largest tumor dimension measured from radiographic studies (R = 0.8; P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029240285&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029240285&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0090-4295(95)80007-7

DO - 10.1016/0090-4295(95)80007-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 7855968

AN - SCOPUS:0029240285

VL - 45

SP - 211

EP - 217

JO - Urology

JF - Urology

SN - 0090-4295

IS - 2

ER -