Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections in a cohort of US army recruits

Bonnie L. Smoak, Patrick W. Kelley, David N. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To study the prevalence and risk factors of Helicobacter pylori infectionin healthy young adults, sera were collected from a nationwide sample of 404 females and 534 males (mean age, 20.2; range, 17-26 years) at induction into the US Army at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, during the fall of 1990. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PYLORI STAT, BioWhittaker, Inc., Walkersville, MD) was used to detect H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies. Demographic data were obtained from a personnel database and by linking US census information to the subject's home address. The observed crude seropositivity rate was 26.3% (95% confidence interval 23.2-28.9). The direct sex-, race-, and geographic region-adjusted seropositivity rate was 20.8% (95% confidence interval 17.9-23.7). Seropositivity rates for blacks, Hispanics, and whites were 44%, 38%, and 14%, respectively, (X2, P <0.001), and rates increased progressively from 24% in the age group 17-18 years to 43% in the age group 24-26 years (X2 for trend, P <0.001). The age trends remained strong after controlling for race Median income was also an important predictive variable for seropositivity (X2, P <0.0001). Sex, the percent urbanization, and population density of the home county were not significant predictors of seropositivity when age and race-ethnic group were controlled in a statistical model. The sharp increase in seroprevalence in this narrow age range suggests that the incidence rates are higher in young adults than previously reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-519
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume139
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Seroepidemiologic Studies
Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Young Adult
Age Groups
Confidence Intervals
Urbanization
Statistical Models
Censuses
Population Density
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Immunoglobulin G
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Demography
Databases
Antibodies
Incidence
Serum

Keywords

  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections in a cohort of US army recruits. / Smoak, Bonnie L.; Kelley, Patrick W.; Taylor, David N.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 139, No. 5, 01.03.1994, p. 513-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smoak, BL, Kelley, PW & Taylor, DN 1994, 'Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections in a cohort of US army recruits', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 139, no. 5, pp. 513-519.
Smoak, Bonnie L. ; Kelley, Patrick W. ; Taylor, David N. / Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections in a cohort of US army recruits. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1994 ; Vol. 139, No. 5. pp. 513-519.
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