Seroepidemiology of infection with human papillomavirus 16, in men and women attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States

Deborah L. Thompson, John M. Douglas, Mark Foster, Michael E. Hagensee, Carolyn DiGuiseppi, Anna E. Barón, Jennifer E. Cameron, Timothy C. Spencer, Jonathan Mark Zenilman, C. Kevin Malotte, Gail Bolan, Mary L. Kamb, Thomas A. Peterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. The study sought to characterize the seroprevalence, seropersistence, and seroincidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 antibody, as well as the behavioral risk factors for HPV-16 seropositivity. Methods. Serologic data at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-up visits were used to examine the seroprevalence, seropersistence, and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody in 1595 patients attending United States clinics treating sexually transmitted disease. Testing for antibody to HPV-16 was performed by capture enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using viruslike particles. Results. The seroprevalence of HPV-16 antibody was 24.5% overall and was higher in women than in men (30.2% vs. 18.7%, respectively). In those who were HPV-16 seropositive at baseline, antibody response persisted to 12 months in 72.5% of women and in 45.6% of men. The seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody was 20.2/100 person-years (py) overall, 25.4/100 py in women, and 15.7/100 py in men. In multivariate analysis, the seroprevalence of HPV-16 antibody was significantly associated with female sex, age >20 years, and the number of episodes of sex with occasional partners during the preceding 3 months, whereas the seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody was significantly associated with female sex, age >20 years, baseline negative ELISA result greater than the median value, and the number of episodes of unprotected sex with occasional partners during the preceding 3 months. Conclusion. Sex- and age-related differences in both the seropositivity and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody persisted after adjustment for behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors, and behavioral risk factors during the preceding 3 months were stronger predictors of the seroprevalence and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody than was lifetime sexual behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1563-1574
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume190
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Human papillomavirus 16
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Infection
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Antibodies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Unsafe Sex
Sexual Behavior
Antibody Formation
Multivariate Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Thompson, D. L., Douglas, J. M., Foster, M., Hagensee, M. E., DiGuiseppi, C., Barón, A. E., ... Peterman, T. A. (2004). Seroepidemiology of infection with human papillomavirus 16, in men and women attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 190(9), 1563-1574. https://doi.org/10.1086/423817

Seroepidemiology of infection with human papillomavirus 16, in men and women attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States. / Thompson, Deborah L.; Douglas, John M.; Foster, Mark; Hagensee, Michael E.; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Barón, Anna E.; Cameron, Jennifer E.; Spencer, Timothy C.; Zenilman, Jonathan Mark; Malotte, C. Kevin; Bolan, Gail; Kamb, Mary L.; Peterman, Thomas A.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 190, No. 9, 01.11.2004, p. 1563-1574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, DL, Douglas, JM, Foster, M, Hagensee, ME, DiGuiseppi, C, Barón, AE, Cameron, JE, Spencer, TC, Zenilman, JM, Malotte, CK, Bolan, G, Kamb, ML & Peterman, TA 2004, 'Seroepidemiology of infection with human papillomavirus 16, in men and women attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 190, no. 9, pp. 1563-1574. https://doi.org/10.1086/423817
Thompson, Deborah L. ; Douglas, John M. ; Foster, Mark ; Hagensee, Michael E. ; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn ; Barón, Anna E. ; Cameron, Jennifer E. ; Spencer, Timothy C. ; Zenilman, Jonathan Mark ; Malotte, C. Kevin ; Bolan, Gail ; Kamb, Mary L. ; Peterman, Thomas A. / Seroepidemiology of infection with human papillomavirus 16, in men and women attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 190, No. 9. pp. 1563-1574.
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abstract = "Background. The study sought to characterize the seroprevalence, seropersistence, and seroincidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 antibody, as well as the behavioral risk factors for HPV-16 seropositivity. Methods. Serologic data at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-up visits were used to examine the seroprevalence, seropersistence, and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody in 1595 patients attending United States clinics treating sexually transmitted disease. Testing for antibody to HPV-16 was performed by capture enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using viruslike particles. Results. The seroprevalence of HPV-16 antibody was 24.5{\%} overall and was higher in women than in men (30.2{\%} vs. 18.7{\%}, respectively). In those who were HPV-16 seropositive at baseline, antibody response persisted to 12 months in 72.5{\%} of women and in 45.6{\%} of men. The seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody was 20.2/100 person-years (py) overall, 25.4/100 py in women, and 15.7/100 py in men. In multivariate analysis, the seroprevalence of HPV-16 antibody was significantly associated with female sex, age >20 years, and the number of episodes of sex with occasional partners during the preceding 3 months, whereas the seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody was significantly associated with female sex, age >20 years, baseline negative ELISA result greater than the median value, and the number of episodes of unprotected sex with occasional partners during the preceding 3 months. Conclusion. Sex- and age-related differences in both the seropositivity and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody persisted after adjustment for behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors, and behavioral risk factors during the preceding 3 months were stronger predictors of the seroprevalence and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody than was lifetime sexual behavior.",
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AU - Thompson, Deborah L.

AU - Douglas, John M.

AU - Foster, Mark

AU - Hagensee, Michael E.

AU - DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

AU - Barón, Anna E.

AU - Cameron, Jennifer E.

AU - Spencer, Timothy C.

AU - Zenilman, Jonathan Mark

AU - Malotte, C. Kevin

AU - Bolan, Gail

AU - Kamb, Mary L.

AU - Peterman, Thomas A.

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N2 - Background. The study sought to characterize the seroprevalence, seropersistence, and seroincidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 antibody, as well as the behavioral risk factors for HPV-16 seropositivity. Methods. Serologic data at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-up visits were used to examine the seroprevalence, seropersistence, and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody in 1595 patients attending United States clinics treating sexually transmitted disease. Testing for antibody to HPV-16 was performed by capture enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using viruslike particles. Results. The seroprevalence of HPV-16 antibody was 24.5% overall and was higher in women than in men (30.2% vs. 18.7%, respectively). In those who were HPV-16 seropositive at baseline, antibody response persisted to 12 months in 72.5% of women and in 45.6% of men. The seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody was 20.2/100 person-years (py) overall, 25.4/100 py in women, and 15.7/100 py in men. In multivariate analysis, the seroprevalence of HPV-16 antibody was significantly associated with female sex, age >20 years, and the number of episodes of sex with occasional partners during the preceding 3 months, whereas the seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody was significantly associated with female sex, age >20 years, baseline negative ELISA result greater than the median value, and the number of episodes of unprotected sex with occasional partners during the preceding 3 months. Conclusion. Sex- and age-related differences in both the seropositivity and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody persisted after adjustment for behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors, and behavioral risk factors during the preceding 3 months were stronger predictors of the seroprevalence and seroincidence of HPV-16 antibody than was lifetime sexual behavior.

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