Serodiagnosis of rotavirus during an epidemic of gastroenteritis on an adult orthopedic unit

Bruce S. Klein, Diane Jaeger, Jeffrey P. Davis, Wendy L. Schell, G. William Gary, Robert H Yolken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epidemiologic features of adult rotavirus infection are incompletely understood. Between 18 May and 8 June 1982, acute gastroenteritis occurred in 14 of 100 (14%) patients and eight of 57 (14%) staff at a hospital orthopedic unit. Ill persons ranged in age from 24 to 87 years (median 69 years). Anti-rotavirus IgM antibody in an acutephase serum or IgG seroconversion in paired serum specimens was present in nine of 16 persons with gastroenteritis, compared to two of 15 unit staff without gastroenteritis, suggesting that a rotavirus infection was associated with the outbreak. The index case occurred in an 84-year-old woman admitted to the unit on 18 May and attended without enteric precautions until 20 May. To assess risk factors for the development of gastroenteritis on the unit, we conducted a case-control study in eight patients with gastroenteritis and 16 matched controls; we also reviewed the roster of staff assignments to patients during the outbreak period. Illness in patients was associated with the extent of handling by staff (P <0·01), while illness in staff was associated with assignment to symptomatic patients (P = 0·008), suggesting that infection was transmitted from person to person. Rotavirus may account for some nosocomial cases and outbreaks of gastroenteritis among adults in acute-care facilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-44
Number of pages12
JournalSerodiagnosis and Immunotherapy in Infectious Disease
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Rotavirus
Gastroenteritis
Serologic Tests
Orthopedics
Disease Outbreaks
Rotavirus Infections
Hospital Units
Serum
Case-Control Studies
Immunoglobulin G
Antibodies
Infection

Keywords

  • infection control
  • noscomial infection
  • rotavirus
  • rotavirus gastroenteritis
  • serology
  • viral gastroenteritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Serodiagnosis of rotavirus during an epidemic of gastroenteritis on an adult orthopedic unit. / Klein, Bruce S.; Jaeger, Diane; Davis, Jeffrey P.; Schell, Wendy L.; Gary, G. William; Yolken, Robert H.

In: Serodiagnosis and Immunotherapy in Infectious Disease, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1987, p. 33-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klein, Bruce S. ; Jaeger, Diane ; Davis, Jeffrey P. ; Schell, Wendy L. ; Gary, G. William ; Yolken, Robert H. / Serodiagnosis of rotavirus during an epidemic of gastroenteritis on an adult orthopedic unit. In: Serodiagnosis and Immunotherapy in Infectious Disease. 1987 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 33-44.
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