Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1

Andrew W. Artenstein, Patricia A. Hegerich, Christopher Beyrer, Kittipong Rungruengthanakit, Nelson L. Michael, Chawalit Natpratan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that nef-defective SIV can cause attenuated disease in rhesus monkeys and that animals immunized with a similar construct can be protected when challenged with wild-type, pathogenic SIV. This finding has sparked interest in the nef gene of HIV-1. It remains unclear, however, whether nef serves an analogous role in human HIV-1 infection; Deacon et al. have reported an association of deletions in the nef gene with an attenuated disease course in humans, although other work does not support a strict correlation between the structure or function of nef and rates of disease progression. The nef gene product has been shown to influence the infectivity and pathogenicity of HIV-1. nef may also have a role in the immune response to HIV-1. The current database of nef sequences is derived almost exclusively from subtype B viruses. The authors therefore sought to develop a database of nef sequences from subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype E. Whole-blood samples were collected from 103 male commercial sex workers in Chiang Mai, Thailand. 17 tested positive for infection with HIV-1, 16 of whom were infected with subtype E by gp120 characterization. Intersubject variation in subtype E nef genes at the nucleotide level ranged from 2.1-7.8%. Thai subtype E nef sequences are more tightly clustered than subtype B nef sequences, analogous to what is seen in env. The authors note that their subtype E nef sequences do not share the genotypic polymorphism in the area of residues 10-30 noted with subtype B nef. These data confirm the need to develop a set of subtype E-specific reagents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)557-560
Number of pages4
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume12
Issue number6
StatePublished - Apr 10 1996

Fingerprint

nef Genes
Sequence Analysis
HIV-1
nef Gene Products
Databases
Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1
Sex Workers
Thailand
Macaca mulatta
HIV Infections
Virulence
Disease Progression
Nucleotides
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Artenstein, A. W., Hegerich, P. A., Beyrer, C., Rungruengthanakit, K., Michael, N. L., & Natpratan, C. (1996). Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 12(6), 557-560.

Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1. / Artenstein, Andrew W.; Hegerich, Patricia A.; Beyrer, Christopher; Rungruengthanakit, Kittipong; Michael, Nelson L.; Natpratan, Chawalit.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 12, No. 6, 10.04.1996, p. 557-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Artenstein, AW, Hegerich, PA, Beyrer, C, Rungruengthanakit, K, Michael, NL & Natpratan, C 1996, 'Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 557-560.
Artenstein AW, Hegerich PA, Beyrer C, Rungruengthanakit K, Michael NL, Natpratan C. Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 1996 Apr 10;12(6):557-560.
Artenstein, Andrew W. ; Hegerich, Patricia A. ; Beyrer, Christopher ; Rungruengthanakit, Kittipong ; Michael, Nelson L. ; Natpratan, Chawalit. / Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 1996 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 557-560.
@article{d11e7fa87ee747f9b97545f34380f4d3,
title = "Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1",
abstract = "It has been demonstrated that nef-defective SIV can cause attenuated disease in rhesus monkeys and that animals immunized with a similar construct can be protected when challenged with wild-type, pathogenic SIV. This finding has sparked interest in the nef gene of HIV-1. It remains unclear, however, whether nef serves an analogous role in human HIV-1 infection; Deacon et al. have reported an association of deletions in the nef gene with an attenuated disease course in humans, although other work does not support a strict correlation between the structure or function of nef and rates of disease progression. The nef gene product has been shown to influence the infectivity and pathogenicity of HIV-1. nef may also have a role in the immune response to HIV-1. The current database of nef sequences is derived almost exclusively from subtype B viruses. The authors therefore sought to develop a database of nef sequences from subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype E. Whole-blood samples were collected from 103 male commercial sex workers in Chiang Mai, Thailand. 17 tested positive for infection with HIV-1, 16 of whom were infected with subtype E by gp120 characterization. Intersubject variation in subtype E nef genes at the nucleotide level ranged from 2.1-7.8{\%}. Thai subtype E nef sequences are more tightly clustered than subtype B nef sequences, analogous to what is seen in env. The authors note that their subtype E nef sequences do not share the genotypic polymorphism in the area of residues 10-30 noted with subtype B nef. These data confirm the need to develop a set of subtype E-specific reagents.",
author = "Artenstein, {Andrew W.} and Hegerich, {Patricia A.} and Christopher Beyrer and Kittipong Rungruengthanakit and Michael, {Nelson L.} and Chawalit Natpratan",
year = "1996",
month = "4",
day = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "557--560",
journal = "AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses",
issn = "0889-2229",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the nef gene from Thai subjects harboring subtype E HIV-1

AU - Artenstein, Andrew W.

AU - Hegerich, Patricia A.

AU - Beyrer, Christopher

AU - Rungruengthanakit, Kittipong

AU - Michael, Nelson L.

AU - Natpratan, Chawalit

PY - 1996/4/10

Y1 - 1996/4/10

N2 - It has been demonstrated that nef-defective SIV can cause attenuated disease in rhesus monkeys and that animals immunized with a similar construct can be protected when challenged with wild-type, pathogenic SIV. This finding has sparked interest in the nef gene of HIV-1. It remains unclear, however, whether nef serves an analogous role in human HIV-1 infection; Deacon et al. have reported an association of deletions in the nef gene with an attenuated disease course in humans, although other work does not support a strict correlation between the structure or function of nef and rates of disease progression. The nef gene product has been shown to influence the infectivity and pathogenicity of HIV-1. nef may also have a role in the immune response to HIV-1. The current database of nef sequences is derived almost exclusively from subtype B viruses. The authors therefore sought to develop a database of nef sequences from subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype E. Whole-blood samples were collected from 103 male commercial sex workers in Chiang Mai, Thailand. 17 tested positive for infection with HIV-1, 16 of whom were infected with subtype E by gp120 characterization. Intersubject variation in subtype E nef genes at the nucleotide level ranged from 2.1-7.8%. Thai subtype E nef sequences are more tightly clustered than subtype B nef sequences, analogous to what is seen in env. The authors note that their subtype E nef sequences do not share the genotypic polymorphism in the area of residues 10-30 noted with subtype B nef. These data confirm the need to develop a set of subtype E-specific reagents.

AB - It has been demonstrated that nef-defective SIV can cause attenuated disease in rhesus monkeys and that animals immunized with a similar construct can be protected when challenged with wild-type, pathogenic SIV. This finding has sparked interest in the nef gene of HIV-1. It remains unclear, however, whether nef serves an analogous role in human HIV-1 infection; Deacon et al. have reported an association of deletions in the nef gene with an attenuated disease course in humans, although other work does not support a strict correlation between the structure or function of nef and rates of disease progression. The nef gene product has been shown to influence the infectivity and pathogenicity of HIV-1. nef may also have a role in the immune response to HIV-1. The current database of nef sequences is derived almost exclusively from subtype B viruses. The authors therefore sought to develop a database of nef sequences from subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype E. Whole-blood samples were collected from 103 male commercial sex workers in Chiang Mai, Thailand. 17 tested positive for infection with HIV-1, 16 of whom were infected with subtype E by gp120 characterization. Intersubject variation in subtype E nef genes at the nucleotide level ranged from 2.1-7.8%. Thai subtype E nef sequences are more tightly clustered than subtype B nef sequences, analogous to what is seen in env. The authors note that their subtype E nef sequences do not share the genotypic polymorphism in the area of residues 10-30 noted with subtype B nef. These data confirm the need to develop a set of subtype E-specific reagents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029958999&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029958999&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8679312

AN - SCOPUS:0029958999

VL - 12

SP - 557

EP - 560

JO - AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses

JF - AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses

SN - 0889-2229

IS - 6

ER -