Sensory, motor, and combined contexts for context-specific adaptation of saccade gain in humans

Mark Shelhamer, Richard Clendaniel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Saccadic eye movements can be adapted in a context-specific manner such that their gain can be made to depend on the state of a prevailing context cue. We asked whether context cues are more effective if their nature is primarily sensory, motor, or a combination of sensory and motor. Subjects underwent context-specific adaptation using one of three different context cues: a pure sensory context (head roll-tilt right or left); a pure motor context (changes in saccade direction); or a combined sensory-motor context (head roll-tilt and changes in saccade direction). We observed context-specific adaptation in each condition; the greatest degree of context-specificity occurred in paradigms that used the motor cue, alone or in conjunction with the sensory cue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-204
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume332
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 8 2002

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Context
  • Human
  • Motor learning
  • Saccade

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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