Sensitivity of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting developmental venous anomalies and associated cavernomas and microhemorrhages in children

Allen Young, Andrea Poretti, Thangamadhan Bosemani, Reema Goel, Thierry A.G.M. Huisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are common neuroimaging abnormalities that are traditionally diagnosed by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as the gold standard. We aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of SWI in detecting DVA and associated cavernous malformations (CM) and microhemorrhages in children in order to determine if SWI may replace contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. Methods: Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were used as diagnostic gold standard for DVA. The presence of DVA was qualitatively assessed on axial SWI and T2-weighted images by an experienced pediatric neuroradiologist. In addition, the presence of CM and microhemorrhages was evaluated on SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Results: Fifty-seven children with DVA (34 males, mean age at neuroimaging 11.2 years, range 1 month to 17.9 years) were included in this study. Forty-nine out of 57 DVA were identified on SWI (sensitivity of 86%) and 16 out of 57 DVA were detected on T2-weighted images (sensitivity of 28.1%). General anesthesia-related changes in brain hemodynamics and oxygenation were most likely responsible for the majority of SWI false negative. CM were detected in 12 patients on axial SWI, but only in six on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Associated microhemorrhages could be identified in four patients on both axial SWI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, although more numerous and conspicuous on SWI. Conclusion: SWI can identify DVA and associated cavernous malformations and microhemorrhages with high sensitivity, obviating the need for contrast-enhanced MRI sequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)797-802
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroradiology
Volume59
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Children
  • Developmental venous anomaly
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Susceptibility-weighted imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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