Self-reported sleep duration and time in bed as predictors of physical function decline

Results from the InCHIANTI study

Sari Stenholm, Erkki Kronholm, Stefania Bandinelli, Jack M. Guralnik, Luigi Ferrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study Objectives: To characterize elderly persons into sleep/rest groups based on their self-reported habitual total sleeping time (TST) and habitual time in bed (TIB) and to examine the prospective association between sleep/rest behavior on physical function decline. Design: Population-based InCHIANTI study with 6 years follow-up (Tuscany, Italy). Setting: Community. Participants: Men and women aged ≥ 65 years (n = 751). Measurements and Results: At baseline, participants were categorized into 5 sleep/rest behavior groups according to their self-reported TST and TIB, computed from bedtime and wake-up time. Physical function was assessed at baseline and at 3- and 6-year follow-ups as walking speed, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and self-reported mobility disability (ability to walk 400 m or climb one flight of stairs). Both long (≥ 9 h) TST and long TIB predicted accelerated decline in objectively measured physical performance and greater incidence in subjectively assessed mobility disability, but short (≤ 6 h) TST did not. After combining TST and TIB, long sleepers (TST and TIB ≥ 9 h) experienced the greatest decline in physical performance and had the highest risk for incident mobility disability in comparison to mid-range sleepers with 7-8 h TST and TIB. Subjective short sleepers reporting short (≤ 6 h) TST but long (≥ 9 h) TIB showed a greater decline in SPPB score and had a higher risk of incident mobility disability than true short sleepers with short (≤ 6 h) TST and TIB ≤ 8 hours. Conclusions: Extended time in bed as well as long total sleeping time is associated with greater physical function decline than mid-range or short sleep. TIB offers important additive information to the self-reported sleep duration when evaluating the consequences of sleep duration on health and functional status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1583-1593
Number of pages11
JournalSleep
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep
Aptitude
Italy
Health Status

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Disability
  • Epidemiology
  • Follow-up studies
  • Gerontology
  • Physical performance
  • Sleep
  • Sleep duration
  • Time in bed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Stenholm, S., Kronholm, E., Bandinelli, S., Guralnik, J. M., & Ferrucci, L. (2011). Self-reported sleep duration and time in bed as predictors of physical function decline: Results from the InCHIANTI study. Sleep, 34(11), 1583-1593. https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.1402

Self-reported sleep duration and time in bed as predictors of physical function decline : Results from the InCHIANTI study. / Stenholm, Sari; Kronholm, Erkki; Bandinelli, Stefania; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi.

In: Sleep, Vol. 34, No. 11, 01.11.2011, p. 1583-1593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stenholm, S, Kronholm, E, Bandinelli, S, Guralnik, JM & Ferrucci, L 2011, 'Self-reported sleep duration and time in bed as predictors of physical function decline: Results from the InCHIANTI study', Sleep, vol. 34, no. 11, pp. 1583-1593. https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.1402
Stenholm, Sari ; Kronholm, Erkki ; Bandinelli, Stefania ; Guralnik, Jack M. ; Ferrucci, Luigi. / Self-reported sleep duration and time in bed as predictors of physical function decline : Results from the InCHIANTI study. In: Sleep. 2011 ; Vol. 34, No. 11. pp. 1583-1593.
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