Self-reported sleep and β-amyloid deposition in community-dwelling older adults

Adam P. Spira, Alyssa A. Gamaldo, Yang An, Mark N. Wu, Eleanor M. Simonsick, Murat Bilgel, Yun Zhou, Dean F. Wong, Luigi Ferrucci, Susan M. Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Older adults commonly report disturbed sleep, and recent studies in humans and animals suggest links between sleep and Alzheimer disease biomarkers. Studies are needed that evaluate whether sleep variables are associated with neuroimaging evidence of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between self-reported sleep variables and Aβ deposition in community-dwelling older adults. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional study of 70 adults (mean age, 76 [range, 53-91] years) from the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, a normative aging study. EXPOSURE: Self-reported sleep variables. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: β-Amyloid burden, measured by carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography distribution volume ratios (DVRs). RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, reports of shorter sleep duration were associated with greater Aβ burden, measured by mean cortical DVR (B = 0.08 [95% CI, 0.03-0.14]; P = .005) and precuneus DVR (B = 0.11 [0.03-0.18]; P = .007). Reports of lower sleep quality were associated with greater Aβ burden measured by precuneus DVR (B = 0.08 [0.01-0.15]; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among community-dwelling older adults, reports of shorter sleep duration and poorer sleep quality are associated with greater Aβ burden. Additional studies with objective sleep measures are needed to determine whether sleep disturbance causes or accelerates Alzheimer disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1537-1543
Number of pages7
JournalJAMA Neurology
Volume70
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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