Self-reported Exposure to Sexual and Reproductive Health Information among American Indian Youth: Implications for Technology Based Intervention

Mike Anastario, Paula FireMoon, Adriann Ricker, Shannon Holder, Elizabeth Rink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While technology-based interventions show promise in certain populations of American youth, the technology may intrinsically widen intergenerational communication chasms associated with youth’s increased access to Smartphone technologies. The authors examined self-reported exposure to sexual and reproductive health information and evaluated its relationship with sexual risk behaviors with American Indian youth. Approximately 296 students, ages of 15–18 years old, were surveyed to examine self-reported exposure and attitudes to information received about sexual intercourse, reproduction, and social media use in relation to sexual risk behaviors. Results indicate that information received regarding sexual intercourse and birth control from intra-familial network members was associated with more engagement in sex, and that increased social media use to talk or learn about sex was associated with not using a condom at the last sexual encounter. We advise that researchers and programmers considering technology-based interventions with AI communities carefully consider the gravity of investing preventive resources into technology-based interventions that may further deepen communication gaps that youth experience within their community networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-420
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of health communication
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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