Self-management, satisfaction with family functioning, and the course of psychological symptoms in emerging adults with spina bifida

Melissa H. Bellin, Nienke Dosa, T. Andrew Zabel, Elizabeth Aparicio, Brad E. Dicianno, Philip Osteen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To explore psychological symptoms in emerging adults with spina bifida (SB) and their association with self-management and satisfaction with family functioning. Methods: Longitudinal data were collected at 2 time points, 15 months apart, in 48 individuals with SB. Reliable change indices and paired samples t-tests assessed change in anxiety and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical regression models explored the contributions of SB severity, family satisfaction, and self-management in explaining change in psychological symptoms. Results: No significant group level differences in psychological symptoms were found across time in participants (Mean age 22 years), but significant individual-level change in anxiety symptoms (n = 13) and depressive symptoms (n = 9) was observed. Improved satisfaction with family functioning was associated with decreased anxiety symptoms (b = -0.30, p =. 02), and increased SB self-management was related to reduced depressive symptoms (b = -0.63, p =. 01). Conclusions: Changes in self-management and satisfaction with family functioning may influence the course of psychological symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-62
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Keywords

  • Emerging adulthood
  • Family functioning
  • Psychological symptoms
  • Self-management
  • Spina bifida

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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