Self-efficacy mediates strength gains during circuit weight training in men with coronary artery disease

Craig K. Ewart, Kerry Stewart, Ronald E. Gillilan, Michael Kelemen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

EWART, C. K., K. J. STEWART, R. E. GILLILAN, and M. H. KELEMEN. Self-efficacy mediates strength gains during circuit weight training in men with coronary artery disease. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 18, No. 5, pp. 531-540, 1986. Motivation to engage in health-promoting exercise has been ascribed to global personality traits such as self-esteem or athletic self-confidence. Self-Efficacy Theory challenges this view by proposing that highly specific estimates of personal capabilities mediate adoption of new or difficult behavior patterns. We tested this assumption by measuring self-efficacy perceptions in 40 men with coronary artery disease who participated in an experiment evaluating effects of circuit weight training (CWT). Specific self-efficacy estimates were assessed during baseline strength/endurance testing and after 10 wk participation in CWT or volleyball. Correlational analyses of self-efficacy in relation to performance on strength/endurance tests strongly supported the contention that adoption of novel activities is governed by highly specific self-perceptions. Participation in CWT produced greater strength and endurance gains than did volleyball, and these changes were accompanied by increased self-efficacy in CWT subjects for activities resembling the training tasks. The assertion that self-efficacy perceptions directly mediate involvement in challenging physical activities was supported by multiple regression analyses. These revealed that pre-training self-efficacy judgments predicted post-test strength gains even after controlling for baseline strength, type of training, and frequency of participation in exercise sessions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-540
Number of pages10
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume18
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Coronary Artery Disease
Weights and Measures
Volleyball
Exercise
Self Concept
Sports
Resistance Training
Circuit-Based Exercise
Personality
Motivation
Teaching
Regression Analysis
Health

Keywords

  • Cardiac rehabilitation
  • Exercise adherence
  • Heart disease
  • Self-efficacy
  • Self-perception
  • Strength testing
  • Treadmill testing
  • Weight training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Self-efficacy mediates strength gains during circuit weight training in men with coronary artery disease. / Ewart, Craig K.; Stewart, Kerry; Gillilan, Ronald E.; Kelemen, Michael.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 18, No. 5, 1986, p. 531-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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