Self-efficacy for smoking cessation counseling parents in primary care: An office-based intervention for pediatricians and family physicians

Arvin Garg, Janet R. Serwint, Susan Higman, Ann Kanof, Dottie Schell, Iris Colon, Arlene M. Butz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Few pediatricians or family physicians routinely counsel parental smokers to quit smoking. Poor self-efficacy in smoking cessation counseling skills may be one barrier to counseling. Analysis of self-efficacy scores of physicians participating in the Clean Air for Healthy Children program demonstrates that pediatricians had higher self-efficacy scores for explaining the health risks of environmental tobacco smoke on children (P < .05); family physicians had higher self-efficacy scores for smoking cessation counseling knowledge (P < .05). Posttraining, both pediatricians and family physicians who participated in an office-based smoking cessation counseling program had significantly higher scores in all 4 self-efficacy domains (P < .01).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-257
Number of pages6
JournalClinical pediatrics
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Keywords

  • Environmental tobacco smoke
  • Family physician
  • Pediatrician
  • Self-efficacy
  • Smoking cessation counseling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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