Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use is associated with right ventricular structure and function

The MESA-Right ventricle study

Corey E. Ventetuolo, R. Graham Barr, David A. Bluemke, Aditya Jain, Joseph A C Delaney, W. Gregory Hundley, Joao Lima, Steven M. Kawut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Serotonin and the serotonin transporter have been implicated in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may have a role in PH treatment, but the effects of SSRI use on right ventricular (RV) structure and function are unknown. We hypothesized that SSRI use would be associated with RV morphology in a large cohort without cardiovascular disease (N = 4114). Methods: SSRI use was determined by medication inventory during the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis baseline examination. RV measures were assessed via cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The cross-sectional relationship between SSRI use and each RV measure was assessed using multivariable linear regression; analyses for RV mass and end-diastolic volume (RVEDV) were stratified by sex. Results: After adjustment for multiple covariates including depression and left ventricular measures, SSRI use was associated with larger RV stroke volume (RVSV) (2.75 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48-5.02 mL, p = 0.02). Among men only, SSRI use was associated with greater RV mass (1.08 g, 95% CI 0.19-1.97 g, p = 0.02) and larger RVEDV (7.71 mL, 95% 3.02-12.40 mL, p = 0.001). SSRI use may have been associated with larger RVEDV among women and larger RV end-systolic volume in both sexes. Conclusions: SSRI use was associated with higher RVSV in cardiovascular disease-free individuals and, among men, greater RV mass and larger RVEDV. The effects of SSRI use in patients with (or at risk for) RV dysfunction and the role of sex in modifying this relationship warrant further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere30480
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2012

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Right Ventricular Function
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
serotonin
Heart Ventricles
Stroke Volume
Pulmonary Hypertension
stroke
Cardiovascular Diseases
hypertension
cardiovascular diseases
gender
confidence interval
Confidence Intervals
Right Ventricular Dysfunction
lungs
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Women's Rights
Magnetic resonance
Linear regression
Linear Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ventetuolo, C. E., Barr, R. G., Bluemke, D. A., Jain, A., Delaney, J. A. C., Hundley, W. G., ... Kawut, S. M. (2012). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use is associated with right ventricular structure and function: The MESA-Right ventricle study. PLoS One, 7(2), [e30480]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030480

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use is associated with right ventricular structure and function : The MESA-Right ventricle study. / Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Barr, R. Graham; Bluemke, David A.; Jain, Aditya; Delaney, Joseph A C; Hundley, W. Gregory; Lima, Joao; Kawut, Steven M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 2, e30480, 17.02.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ventetuolo, Corey E. ; Barr, R. Graham ; Bluemke, David A. ; Jain, Aditya ; Delaney, Joseph A C ; Hundley, W. Gregory ; Lima, Joao ; Kawut, Steven M. / Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use is associated with right ventricular structure and function : The MESA-Right ventricle study. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 2.
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AU - Jain, Aditya

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AU - Kawut, Steven M.

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