Secure Delivery of HIV-Related and Tuberculosis Laboratory Results to Patient Cell Phones: A Pilot Comparative Study

Lisa DiAndreth, Brooke A. Jarrett, Jessica L. Elf, Thamanna Nishath, Brennan Donville, Omeid Heidari, Sarah Cox, Justine Moreton, Aveer Ramnath, Limakatso Lebina, Ebrahim Variava, Jonathan E. Golub, Neil A. Martinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

South Africa processes 5.1 million HIV CD4, viral load (VL), and tuberculosis (TB) tests annually. This pilot non-randomized trial in South Africa explored an intervention (“MatlaMobile”) to deliver laboratory results via mobile phone. Adults completing CD4, VL, and/or TB laboratory tests were enrolled—either receiving results by returning to clinic (control, n = 174) or mobile phone (intervention, n = 226). Study staff instructed control participants to return within 6 days (standard-of-care). MatlaMobile instructed intervention participants with clinically actionable results requiring intervention or treatment change (i.e., < 200 CD4 cells per milliliter, ≥ 400 viral copies per milliliter, or TB positive) to return immediately. A greater proportion of intervention participants than controls saw their results within 7 days of enrollment (73% vs. 8.6%, p < 0.001). Among participants instructed to return, more intervention participants (20%, n = 14/70) returned than controls (8.6%, n = 15/174, p = 0.02). MatlaMobile demonstrated that patients can quickly receive and respond appropriately to digital delivery of health information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3511-3521
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Cell phone
  • Continuity of patient care
  • Patient compliance
  • Telemedicine
  • mHealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Secure Delivery of HIV-Related and Tuberculosis Laboratory Results to Patient Cell Phones: A Pilot Comparative Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this