Secretory effects of intravenous serotonin on the proximal jejunum of the awake dog

David McFadden, Bernard M. Jaffe, Michael J. Zinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The intestinal secretory effects of hyperserotoninemia were studied in conscious dogs with cannulated, exteriorized chronic proximal jejunal segments. A basal absorptive state for water and electrolytes was significantly changed to a secretory state for water, sodium ion, chloride ion, and potassium ion when serotonin was infused intravenously at 30 μg/kg per minute. This effect disappeared with the cessation of the infusion. During infusion, whole blood serotonin concentrations were similar to those in patients with the carcinoid syndrome. Diarrhea developed in all animals studied during infusion, and significant hypokalemia also occurred. These results support a primary role for serotonin in the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with the carcinoid syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-64
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume149
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Jejunum
Serotonin
Carcinoid Tumor
Dogs
Ions
Diarrhea
Hypokalemia
Water
Sodium Chloride
Electrolytes
Potassium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Secretory effects of intravenous serotonin on the proximal jejunum of the awake dog. / McFadden, David; Jaffe, Bernard M.; Zinner, Michael J.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 149, No. 1, 1985, p. 60-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McFadden, David ; Jaffe, Bernard M. ; Zinner, Michael J. / Secretory effects of intravenous serotonin on the proximal jejunum of the awake dog. In: American Journal of Surgery. 1985 ; Vol. 149, No. 1. pp. 60-64.
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