Secondary and Tertiary Support Systems in Schools Implementing School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: A Preliminary Descriptive Analysis

Katrina J. Debnam, Elise T. Pas, Catherine P. Bradshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

More than 14,000 schools nationwide have been trained in School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS), which aims both to reduce behavior problems and to promote a positive school climate. However, there remains a need to understand the programs and services provided to children who are not responding adequately to the universal level of support. Data from 45 elementary schools implementing SWPBIS were collected using the School-wide Evaluation Tool and the Individual Student Systems Evaluation Tool (I-SSET) to assess the use of school-wide, Tier 2, and Tier 3 support systems. The I-SSET data indicated that nearly all schools implemented federally mandated Tier 2 and Tier 3 supports (e.g., functional behavioral assessment, student support teams), but few schools implemented other evidence-based programs for students with more intensive needs. School-level demographic characteristics were correlated with the implementation of some aspects of universal SWPBIS, but not with the Tier 2 or 3 supports. Implications of these findings for professional development are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-152
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Positive Behavior Interventions
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS)
  • evidence-based programs
  • functional behavioral assessment
  • secondary supports
  • tertiary supports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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